Some Big Ten Team Is Liable To Get Screwed

You know the old saying about not needing to be a rocket scientist to figure something out? In the case of trying to determine Ohio State’s postseason destination, even a rocket scientist might have some trouble.

There is one rock-solid certainty: In the wake of the Oct. 16 loss at Wisconsin, the Buckeyes are no longer in charge of their own destiny. That now rests squarely in the hands of Michigan State and the Bowl Championship Series. OSU still has several hurdles it must clear if it wants to get to the best bowl game possible, of course, but many things are simply out of the Buckeyes’ control – at least right now.

Michigan State is the last undefeated team left standing in the Big Ten, leaving the Spartans four victories away from their first conference championship since 1990 and their first outright crown since 1987.

Winning out would mean the worst Mark Dantonio’s squad could do is a berth in the Rose Bowl, and the way the college football landscape has seemingly changed each week, an undefeated season could very well land Michigan State in the national championship game.

That’s what happens if the Spartans continue to win. If they trip up somewhere – say at Iowa on Oct. 30 – get out your slide rules and calculators. The possibilities are endless.

For argument’s sake, let’s say Iowa engineers that upset and then Michigan State goes on to beat Minnesota, Purdue and Penn State in its final three games. That is a plausible scenario that would leave Sparty with a 7-1 conference record and 11-1 overall.

Wisconsin, which takes a well-deserved week off Oct. 30, finishes its regular season against good (but certainly not great) opposition. The Badgers are at Purdue, home with Indiana, at Michigan and home with Northwestern, and it wouldn’t be much a stretch to believe Bucky could win each of those games and finish 7-1 in the conference and 11-1 overall.

And then there are the Buckeyes.

Ohio State would obviously need to win the rest of its games to match a 7-1 league record and 11-1 overall mark. That means road victories at Minnesota on Oct. 30 and at Iowa on Nov. 20, and home wins against old rival Penn State on Nov. 13 and archrival Michigan on Nov. 27.

Should the Buckeyes win those games, and all of the other aforementioned scenarios come to pass, there would be a three-way tie for the Big Ten championship between Michigan State, Wisconsin and Ohio State, and which teams receive which bowl bids would be determined by a series of prearranged conference tiebreakers.

The No. 1 tiebreaker is national championship game participation, but since no one can envision a one-loss Big Ten team finishing No. 1 or No. 2 in the final BCS standings, we’ll move quickly to the second tiebreaker.

That one eliminates any ineligible teams. Since the Spartans, Badgers or Buckeyes are under no NCAA sanctions, we can easily dismiss this tiebreaker as well.

And now things begin to get more complicated.

If three teams are tied, and if one team has defeated both of the other teams, that team shall be designated as the Big Ten’s representative to the Rose Bowl. However, since Michigan State and Ohio State will not face one another this season, this tiebreaker is rendered moot.

If three teams are still tied, and if two of the three teams defeated the third team, the third team is eliminated, and the remaining two teams shall revert to the two-team tie procedure.

This tiebreaker is also inoperative because none of the three teams would have beaten the other two. Michigan State beat Wisconsin but not Ohio State, Wisconsin beat Ohio State but not Michigan State, and Ohio State would have beaten neither Michigan State nor Wisconsin.

The next tiebreaker states that if the three teams are still tied, and there is a tie game between two of the three teams, or if two or all three of the teams did not play each other, the representative shall be determined on a percentage basis of all games played.

With overtime implemented in college football since 1996, you wonder why verbiage regarding tie games remains in any tiebreaking criteria. Even so, the percentage basis for all three co-champions would be the same based upon identical overall records.

The tiebreaker formula goes on to state that if three teams are still tied, and one of the three teams is eliminated through the percentage basis of all games played, the remaining two teams shall revert to the two-team tie procedure. But they don’t, so we won’t.

Finally, if the three teams are still tied, and all three teams have the same winning percentage of all games played, the highest-ranked team in the final BCS standings shall be the representative.

Now things really begin to get interesting.

The BCS standings released Oct. 24 had Michigan State at No. 5, Wisconsin at No. 10 and Ohio State at No. 11.

Should the Spartans lose to Iowa, they would likely be shuffled back behind Wisconsin and Ohio State in the standings. Meanwhile, a victory at Iowa City would likely benefit the Buckeyes, and Wisconsin will probably not be able to make up much ground since it finishes the season against four unranked teams.

Follow that logic – if you can – and a three-way tie between Ohio State, Michigan State and Wisconsin could put the Buckeyes in the Rose Bowl for the season year in a row and leave either the Spartans or the Badgers getting an at-large berth for one of the other BCS bowls.

The worst thing about the entire scenario? Rules state a single conference can send no more than two teams to the BCS in one year, meaning one of those three Big Ten teams is likely to wind up playing in the Capital One Bowl. With all due respect to our friends in Orlando, that would be a pitiful consolation prize for a Big Ten championship team sporting an 11-1 record.

OSU-MINNESOTA TIDBITS

** This marks the 50th meeting between Ohio State and Minnesota with the Buckeyes holding a decisive 42-7 record in the overall series. OSU is 20-4 against the Golden Gophers in Minneapolis, including victories in each of their last 11 trips there. Minnesota hasn’t beaten Ohio State in Minneapolis since 1981, a 35-31 decision in old Memorial Stadium.

** This will mark OSU’s first visit to Minnesota’s two-year-old TCF Bank Stadium. The Buckeyes were a perfect 11-0 against the Gophers in the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome.

** Minnesota hasn’t exactly distinguished itself at its new home. The Gophers are 0-5 at TCF Bank Stadium this season and only 4-8 since the facility opened last year.

** Ohio State head coach Jim Tressel is a perfect 7-0 against the Gophers, including last year’s 38-7 victory in Columbus. The average margin of victory for the Buckeyes in those six games has been 22.7 points.

** The Buckeyes have won seven in a row against the Gophers and 23 of the last 24 meetings. The only Minnesota victory during that stretch was a 29-17 decision in Columbus that ruined OSU’s homecoming in 2000.

** Minnesota interim head coach Jeff Horton will be piloting his second game after Tim Brewster was fired Oct. 16. Horton has a 20-49 record in six previous seasons as a head coach at Nevada (1993) and UNLV (1994-98). He was also quarterbacks coach at Wisconsin from 1999-2005 during which the Badgers enjoyed a 4-2 record against Ohio State.

** The Golden Gophers enter tomorrow night’s game on a seven-game losing streak, their longest since losing 10 in a row to finish out the 2007 season. That 10-game losing streak equaled a school record set in 1957-58 and equaled in 1983.

** This will be the third and final night game of the 2010 regular season for the Buckeyes. They are 1-1 this year and 16-11 overall in primetime under Tressel. OSU is also 0-1 this season and 8-4 overall in Big Ten night games away from home during the Tressel era.

** The Ohio State kickoff return coverage unit will get another test this week with Minnesota junior Troy Stoudermire. He boasts a career kickoff return average of 24.8 yards, and that is good enough for an eighth-place tie all-time in the Big Ten. The longstanding conference leader in career kickoff returns is Stan Brown of Purdue, who averaged 28.8 yards per return from 1968-70.

** The Buckeyes rank among the top 10 schools nationally in nine different statistical categories. They are second in turnover margin (plus-11), third in total defense (234.5 yards per game), pass efficiency defense (94.2) and turnover margin average (plus-1.38), fifth in rushing defense (85.8) and pass defense (148.8), sixth in scoring offense (40.8), and ninth in scoring defense (14.0 points per game) and kickoff return average (26.2).

** Minnesota quarterback Adam Weber is his school’s all-time leader in several offensive categories and among the Big Ten career leaders in several more. That includes fifth in career passing yardage with 10,199. The top four are Drew Brees of Purdue (11,792, 1997-2000), Curtis Painter of Purdue (11,163, 2005-08), Brett Basanez of Northwestern (10,580, 2002-05) and Chuck Long of Iowa (10,461, 1981-85).

** Weber is serving as a Minnesota co-captain for a third season, and according to research by the school’s sports information department, he is one of only 11 players in Division I-A history who have served at least three years as a team captain.

** Minnesota sophomore linebacker Ryan Grant has excellent bloodlines – he is the grandson of former Minnesota Vikings head coach Bud Grant. Before his NFL coaching career, Grant was a three-sport letterman for the Gophers who went on to playing careers in the NBA, NFL and Canadian Football League. Before taking over as head coach of the Vikings in 1967 and leading them to four Super Bowl appearances, Grant won four Grey Cups as head coach of the Canadian Football League’s Winnipeg Blue Bombers. He was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in 1983, and into the Pro Football Hall of Fame one year later.

** The game will feature a pair of accurate placekickers. Minnesota senior Eric Ellestad made 48 consecutive PATs to begin his career before missing one earlier this season against Wisconsin. Meanwhile, OSU senior Drew Barclay has never missed in 52 career PAT attempts.

** Barclay is a perfect 40 for 40 this season in conversion kicks. That ties him with Tim Williams (1990) among Ohio State kickers for the second-most PATs without a miss in a single season. Vlade Janakievski connected on all 44 of his attempts during the 1977 season.

** With 270 yards against Purdue, OSU quarterback Terrelle Pryor moved past the 5,000-yard mark in passing for his career and that makes him only the ninth Ohio State quarterback to pass that milestone. He now has 5,180 for his career, and has moved past Jim Karsatos (5,089, 1984-86) into eighth place on the school’s all-time passing list. Mike Tomczak (5,569, 1981-84) is currently seventh.

** Pryor also became only the seventh active QB in Division I-A with at least 5,000 yards through the air and 1,000 on the ground. The others are Colin Kaepernick of Nevada, Andy Dalton of TCU, Jake Locker of Washington, Austen Arnaud of Iowa State, Tyrod Taylor of Virginia Tech and Diondre Borel of Utah State.

** Additionally, Pryor overtook Troy Smith (6,888, 2003-06) for third place among the school’s career total offense leaders. Pryor now has 6,998 and needs only 154 more to pass Bobby Hoying (7,151, 1992-95) and move into second place all-time. Art Schlichter (8,850, 1978-81) is the OSU career leader.

** Pryor also needs only two more touchdown passes to become only the fifth OSU quarterback ever to toss for 50 or more TDs in his career. The others are Hoying (57), Joe Germaine (56, 1996-98), Smith (54) and Schlichter (50).

** OSU wide receiver Dane Sanzenbacher had 86 yards against Purdue and moved into OSU’s all-time top 15 in receiving yardage. With 1,522 career yards, Sanzenbacher moved past John Frank (1,481, 1980-83) into 15th place. Next up is Terry Glenn (1,677, 1993-95).

** This week’s game will be telecast by ABC on a regional basis. Mike Patrick will have the play by play with Craig James providing color analysis and Ray Bentley reporting for the sidelines. Kickoff is set for shortly after 8 p.m. Eastern. (That’s 7 p.m. local time if you’re going to be in Minneapolis.)

** The game will also be broadcast on Sirius satellite radio channels 90 and 121 as well as XM channels 141 and 196.

** If you listen to the games on the Ohio State Radio Network, you can welcome back play-by-play man Paul Keels tomorrow. Keels returns to the broadcast booth after a two-week absence following abdominal surgery.

** Ohio State will take next week off. The Buckeyes’ next game will be at home Nov. 13 against Penn State. Kickoff time and telecast information have yet to be determined.

THIS WEEK IN COLLEGE FOOTBALL HISTORY

** On Oct. 25, 1980, Purdue quarterback Mark Herrmann threw for 340 yards during his team’s 36-25 victory over Michigan State. Herrmann finished the game with 8,076 career passing yards which broke the NCAA all-time record. By the time he graduated, Hermann has totaled 9,188 passing yards and 707 career completions, both of which were NCAA career records.

** On Oct. 26, 1907, one of the all-time greats made his college football debut. The legendary Jim Thorpe took the field for the first time with the Carlisle (Pa.) Indian Industrial School, and led the Indians to a 26-6 upset of fourth-ranked Penn. The game was held before a crowd of 22,800 at Philadelphia’s historic Franklin Field.

** On Oct. 26, 1985, unranked UTEP used an unusual 2-9 defensive alignment for a 23-16 upset of seventh-ranked BYU, ending the Cougars’ 25-game WAC winning streak.

** On Oct. 27, 1923, the first night game in Big Ten history was held as part of a day-night doubleheader in Chicago. During the afternoon, Chicago took a 20-6 win over Purdue at Stagg Field, and then portable lights were installed at Soldier Field as Illinois shut out Northwestern, 29-0.

** On Oct. 27, 1979, Pitt freshman quarterback Dan Marino came off the bench to throw for 227 yards and two touchdowns, leading the No. 12 Panthers to a 24-7 victory over No. 17 Navy.

** On Oct. 28, 1950, Nevada’s Pat Brady booted an NCAA-record 99-yard punt during a 34-7 loss to Loyola Marymount.

** On Oct. 28, 1967, UTEP quarterback Brooks Dawson set an NCAA record for most consecutive passes completed for a touchdown when he threw six in a row during a 75-12 victory over New Mexico. Making the feat even more remarkable was the fact that the six touchdowns came on Dawson’s first six attempts of the game.

** On Oct. 29, 1988, Oklahoma State running back Barry Sanders rushed for 320 yards to lead his No. 12 Cowboys to a 45-27 win over Kansas State. The performance began a five-game stretch during which Sanders rushed for 1,472 yards, the most rushing yards accumulated over a five-game span in NCAA history. He also became only the second player in college football history to gain more than 200 rushing yards in five consecutive games, and the streak propelled Sanders to an NCAA single-season record 2,628 rushing yards and the 1988 Heisman Trophy.

** Also on Oct. 29, 1988, Washington State scored 28 second-half points during a 34-30 upset win over top-ranked UCLA and its All-America quarterback Troy Aikman.

** On Oct. 30, 1982, Boston College quarterback Doug Flutie threw for a school-record 520 yards, but it wasn’t nearly enough as Penn State scored a 52-17 blowout over the Eagles in Chestnut Hill. The Nittany Lions were led by quarterback Todd Blackledge, who threw for 243 yards and three TDs, and running back Curt Warner, who rushed for 183 yards and two scores.

** On Oct. 30, 1999, Washington quarterback Marques Tuiasosopo was a one-man wrecking crew against Stanford. Tuiasosopo became the first player in NCAA history to throw for at least 300 yards and rush for 200 or more in the same game. He threw for 302 yards and added 207 on the ground in a 35-30 victory over the Cardinal.

** On Nov. 1, 1986, Long Beach State’s Mark Templeton set an NCAA single-game record for receptions by a running back with 18 catches for 173 yards during his team’s 14-3 win over Utah State.

AROUND THE COUNTRY

** The number of undefeated teams at the Football Bowl Subdivision (Division I-A) level has been reduced to seven. The alphabetical list has dwindled to Auburn, Boise State, Michigan State, Missouri, Oregon, TCU and Utah. (This time last year, there were also seven undefeated teams remaining. They were Alabama, Boise State, Cincinnati, Florida, Iowa, Texas and TCU.)

** Boise State extended the nation’s longest current winning streak to 21 with its 49-20 victory Tuesday night over Louisiana Tech. Meanwhile, Western Kentucky rolled to a 54-21 victory over Louisiana-Lafayette last Saturday, and the Hilltoppers ended the nation’s longest losing streak at 26 games. Akron and New Mexico now share the longest losing streak with eight straight defeats.

** Michigan State has started its season with eight straight wins for the first time since 1966, but while an 8-0 mark may be unusual in East Lansing, it isn’t that rare in the Big Ten. This marks the fifth straight season, and sixth in the last seven, that a conference team has posted at least an 8-0 start. Wisconsin started the 2004 season with a 9-0 record while Ohio State and Michigan were 11-0 heading into their traditional regular-season finale in 2006. The Buckeyes started with 10 straight victories in 2007, Penn State was 9-0 in 2008, and Iowa was 9-0 last season.

** Some other schools around the country are celebrating excellent starts as well. Oregon is 7-0 for the first time since 1933. Missouri is 7-0 for the first time since 1960. And Stanford has started a season 6-1 for the first time since 1970.

** Congratulations also to Baylor, who entered the Associated Press rankings this week for the first time since 1993. The Bears moved up to No. 25 after taking a 47-42 win over Kansas State. It was Baylor’s sixth victory of the season, making them eligible to end a 16-year bowl drought.

** On the flip side is Notre Dame, which lost a 35-17 decision to Navy last weekend. It was the worst loss for the Fighting Irish in the series since a 35-14 loss to the Midshipmen in 1963. Of course, the Mids were ranked No. 4 at that time and led by Heisman Trophy winning quarterback Roger Staubach. The last time before last Saturday that Notre Dame had lost by double digits to an unranked Navy team? That was a 33-7 decision in 1956.

** When Florida and Georgia meet tomorrow, the beverages made taste a little watered-down at “The World’s Largest Cocktail Party.” That’s because the Gators and Bulldogs will square off as unranked foes for the first time since 1979.

** Remember when a strong defense always trumped a good offense? It doesn’t seem that way so much anymore. Last week, for example, LSU entered its game against Auburn allowing only 83.6 rushing yards per game, and Auburn finished with 440 yards on the ground. That sent the LSU rush defense from No. 6 in the country to No. 38.

** Three Big Ten quarterbacks are poised to break the conference record for best single-season completion percentage. Dan Persa of Northwestern (75.7), Scott Tolzien of Wisconsin (71.8) and Ricky Stanzi of Iowa (68.1) are all tracking above the single-season mark of 67.8 held since 1993 by Darrell Bevell of Wisconsin.

** Stanzi is also close to the longstanding Big Ten record for best pass efficiency rating in a single season. The Iowa QB heads into play this weekend at 174.9, just shy of the 175.3 established by Michigan’s Bob Chappuis way back in 1947.

** As the leaves begin to fall and October turns to November, I am reminded that I need to come down off the fence and begin formulating an opinion on this year’s Heisman Trophy race. It seems obvious now that Auburn quarterback Cam Newton is the frontrunner. My top three this week would be Newton followed by Boise State QB Kellen Moore and Oregon RB LaMichael James. Also in the running: Stanford QB Andrew Luck, Ohio State QB Terrelle Pryor and Michigan QB Denard Robinson.

** Shortly before noon on Monday morning, Yankee Stadium grounds crews began removing the grass around the skin of the field in preparation for the Notre Dame-Army football game to be played Nov. 20. It will be the first college game ever played at the new Yankee Stadium, and the first played at any facility called Yankee Stadium since 1987.

** There are models of consistency and then there is Division III Linfield College (Ore.). The Wildcats scored a 35-20 victory last weekend over Pacific Lutheran (Wash.) and clinched their 55th consecutive winning season. Linfield is coached by Joseph Smith, currently in his fifth season as head coach. Smith was a four-year starting cornerback for the Wildcats in the early 1990s and was an assistant at Linfield for 13 seasons before taking over the program in 2006.

FEARLESS FORECAST

It was another good week at Forecast Headquarters with only one miss in the straight up picks – and that was Iowa’s one-point loss to Wisconsin. That meant an 8-1 week to push the SU ledger to 73-12 for the season.

Against the spread, we had another winning week at 6-3 which made us 52-30-3 ATS for the season.

We’ll try to keep it going with these games this week.

SATURDAY’S GAMES

Northwestern at Indiana: The Wildcats don’t have an all-time winning record against many conference opponents but they do against the Hoosiers. Northwestern enjoys a 43-34-1 advantage in the series, and perhaps none was more exciting than last year’s 29-28 verdict in Evanston when the Wildcats overcame a 28-3 second-quarter deficit. That meltdown wrecked what had been a promising season at IU as the Hoosiers went on to finish 2009 with five consecutive losses. In fact, they are currently working on an eight-game conference losing streak that figures to get extended if Bill Lynch doesn’t get some of his team’s defensive problems fixed … Northwestern 36, Indiana 30. (12 noon ET, BTN)

No. 22 Miami (Fla.) at Virginia: The Hurricanes are like most middle-of-the-road college football teams – they beat the teams they’re supposed to while struggling against stronger competition. This was supposed to be the year Miami returned to greatness, and while a 5-2 record is pretty good, the Hurricanes have feasted on the likes of Florida A&M and Duke while getting outscored 81-41 in their two losses to Ohio State and Florida State. This week, it should be feasting time again since the Cavaliers have lost three of their last four games, and been outscored by a whopping 111-45 in three conference games so far … Miami 38, Virginia 17. (12 noon ET, ESPN)

Akron at Temple: Since going to Motor City Bowl after the 2005 season, the Zips have lost their zip. Actually, that would be something of an understatement. Since losing that Motor City Bowl game to Memphis, the Zips haven’t enjoyed a winning season and have a 17-39 record over that span. That includes an 0-8 record so far this season, and that dismal record only tells part of the story. There are 120 schools that play Division I-A football and Akron ranks 115th in scoring offense and 118th in scoring defense. That makes it difficult to see how the Zips avoid their first winless season since the 1942 team went 0-7-2 … Temple 41, Akron 10. (1 p.m. ET, No TV)

No. 5 Michigan State at No. 18 Iowa: While the Spartans have found exciting ways to keep their undefeated season going, the Hawkeyes have seemingly invented new ways to self-destruct. Last week’s 31-30 heartbreaker against Wisconsin was a prime example with special teams gaffes, a missed PAT and absolutely atrocious clock management at the end of the game. The pressure to win is equally divided tomorrow. The Spartans now have an outside shot at playing for the national championship while the Hawkeyes have a whole bunch of Ohio State and Wisconsin fans in their corner hoping Iowa can somehow play a mistake-free game. A lot of people are playing the upset card here, especially since MSU hasn’t won in Iowa City since 1989. But the Hawkeyes have yet to convince us they can rise to the occasion … Michigan State 23, Iowa 20. (3:30 p.m. ET, ABC/ESPN)

No. 1 Auburn at Mississippi: After rising to the top of the BCS standings, the Tigers had better be on upset alert tomorrow in Oxford. That’s not because former No. 1s Alabama, Ohio State and Oklahoma have gone down in successive weeks. It’s because Auburn has been anything but invincible in its two previous road games, squeezing out narrow three-point victories at Mississippi State in early September and at Kentucky three weeks ago. It’s because Ole Miss has a pretty good passing game with QB Jeremiah Masoli and the Tigers rank dead last in the SEC in pass defense. And it’s because the Rebels seem to have no fear going against highly-ranked teams – they are 3-3 in their six games against top-10 opponents. All of that isn’t quite enough to pull the trigger on an Upset Special, but don’t be surprised if Ole Miss gives the Tigers all they can handle … Auburn 27, Mississippi 17. (6 p.m. ET, ESPN2)

No. 2 Oregon at USC: While Auburn is on upset alert, the Ducks should be, too, when they visit the Coliseum to face the Trojans who have had two weeks to prepare for this game. Last year, the Quack Attack buried USC under an avalanche of 613 total yards during a 47-20 blowout. But the Trojans have a different defensive scheme this season under new head coach Lane Kiffin, and quarterback Matt Barkley is much more comfortable under center in his second season as the starter. Will that make the difference? Unlikely. With Barkley winging the ball all over the lot, USC can probably stay in the game a little longer this year but the Trojans just don’t have the kind of defensive personnel that can hold off the Ducks for a full 60 minutes … Oregon 52, USC 27. (8 p.m. ET, ABC Regional)

Colorado at No. 9 Oklahoma: Are the Sooners overrated or simply underachievers? A team that was supposed to contend for a national championship has instead struggled at times, especially in crunch time. In its seven games this season, OU has been outscored by a 67-30 margin in the fourth quarter and you sometimes get the feeling that Bob Stoops’ team loses its focus at odds times during a game. That is always a recipe for disaster although it might not make much difference against the hapless Buffaloes. Colorado lost two key players during last week’s 27-24 loss to Texas Tech. Sophomore LB Jon Major, the team’s leading tackler, is gone for the rest of the season with a torn ACL, and starting quarterback Tyler Hansen is sidelined with a ruptured spleen. If the Sooners can’t take care of business this week, when will they ever? … Oklahoma 37, Colorado 10. (9:15 p.m. ET, ESPN2)

Utah State at No. 24 Nevada: The Wolf Pack are not on par with Boise State, TCU or Utah, but they are extremely entertaining and probably deserving of a much higher national ranking. They have an excellent quarterback in Colin Kaepernick, who should be getting at least a little bit of Heisman Trophy love since he is seventh in the nation in total offense. Kaepernick leads an offensive attack that averages 39.9 points and 509.3 yards per game, and that should be more than enough tomorrow night. The Aggies have lost four of their five games, including the last two by a combined 56 points … Nevada 41, Utah State 7. (10:30 p.m. ET, ESPNU)

No. 4 TCU at UNLV: The task is a relatively simple one for the Horned Frogs. They must stay undefeated to have a chance at playing for the national championship. That shouldn’t be much of a problem this week since TCU rarely gets caught up in the glitz and glitter of Sin City. They have won three of their four trips to Las Vegas, and seven of eight in the series overall. That includes a 41-0 stampede a year ago in Fort Worth, a result that could be repeated tomorrow night. The Frogs are No. 1 in the nation in scoring defense, allowing only 9.0 points per game, while the Rebels are 106th nationally in scoring offense, averaging 18.4 points per game. You know the old saying: You can’t win if you can’t score … TCU 45, UNLV 7. (11 p.m. ET, CBS College Sports)

No. 10 Ohio State at Minnesota: In a season that has already featured plenty of Jekyll-and-Hyde moments, which costumes will the Buckeyes don tomorrow night when the Golden Gophers throw their Halloween party at TCF Bank Stadium? Will OSU come dressed as an efficient passing team as it did against Indiana and in the second quarter last week against Purdue? Or will the Buckeyes show up as the ground-it-out rushing team they appeared to be early in the second half at Wisconsin? Perhaps they will feel unmotivated and just throw something together at the last minute as they appeared to do early against Wisconsin. The scariest thing about this Ohio State team is that it is nearing the three-quarter pole of the 2010 season and the Buckeyes are still searching for their own identity. Not that it will matter much against the Gophers, who occupy last place in the Big Ten standings and deservedly so. OSU should go to Minnesota and win by 50 points because that’s what championship teams do. But are the Buckeyes a championship team or simply masquerading as one? Stay tuned … Ohio State 45, Minnesota 10. (8 p.m. ET, ABC Regional)

Here are the spreads for the above games: Northwestern (-3) at Indiana; Miami-FL (-14½) at Virginia; Akron at Temple (-28½); Michigan State (+7) at Iowa; Auburn (-6½) at Mississippi; Oregon (-6½) at USC; Colorado at Oklahoma (-23½); Utah State at Nevada (-25½); TCU (-34½) at UNLV; Ohio State (-25) at Minnesota.

Enjoy the games

Buckeyes Cannot Afford To Take Anything For Granted

“We’ve just got to stop taking stuff for granted.” – Terrelle Pryor following Ohio State’s 31-18 loss to Wisconsin.

Remember last week’s blog with the cautionary wine-drinking vs. grape-stomping tale? Evidently someone over at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center wasn’t listening.

Instead of taking care of business at Camp Randall Stadium, Ohio State wound up on the business end of a 31-18 decision Oct. 16 that was a borderline blowout by Wisconsin.

Forget the national championship. Bye-bye Heisman Trophy. The greatest dreams of the Buckeye Nation went up in smoke as its favorite football team fell victim once again to a lesser opponent who simply wanted it more.

It must be extremely difficult to always be the hunted because every time – and I mean each and every time – the Buckeyes play with a target on their backs, they seem to trip themselves.

The only consensus national championships the team has won in the past half-century came in 1968 and 2002, teams that no one really expected to be title contenders at the beginning of the season.

Forty-two years ago, the Buckeyes were coming off a 1967 campaign that saw them post a 6-3 overall record and finish in fourth place in the Big Ten standings. Sure, Woody Hayes had a star-studded class of super sophomores coming in, but no one expected a national championship right out of the box. OSU played its first game that 1968 season ranked No. 11.

Back in 2002, Ohio State was supposed to be positioning itself for a title run the following year. They played Texas Tech in that season’s opener as the nation’s No. 13 ranked team.

If you would like to go back even further, the 1954 and 1957 national champions each began their respective seasons unranked.

A sharp contrast are the seasons during which the Buckeyes have begun the year ranked among the nation’s top five teams. Over the past half-century, that includes 1962, 1964, 1969, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1980, 1987, 1998, 2003, 2006, 2008 and 2010.

That is 17 (and counting) seasons when OSU has started a campaign at No. 5 or higher in the national polls and come home an also-ran in the national championship race.

The glass-half-full crowd will say that you have to at least be in the race to win it, and there is some veracity to that. Ohio State has been one of college football’s elite programs for much of the last six decades and is one of only a handful of schools that can boast such a winning résumé over such a protracted period of time.

On the other hand, all of the aforementioned seasons – and several others when the Buckeyes reached the top five in midyear – represent an awful lot of crushed hopes and dreams.

Things were supposed to be different in 2010, however. The Buckeyes had learned their lesson from losses last year to USC and Purdue, teams they should have beaten. After a mistake-filled trip to West Lafayette, the team circled its wagons and won six games in a row, finishing things off with a masterful Rose Bowl victory over five-point favorite Oregon.

Everything set up perfectly this year for Ohio State including a favorable schedule. The toughest games on the slate appeared to be a home game in week two with an improving Miami (Fla.) and road tests at Wisconsin and Iowa.

When the Buckeyes demolished the Hurricanes in a game that was not nearly as close as the final score of 36-24 indicated, OSU seemingly had everything going its way. Sure, Wisconsin always played them tough, but the Buckeyes had won four of their last five trips to Madison. They have had similar recent success in Iowa City, winning 14 of their 17 visits there.

Ohio State was going to storm through the last six games of its regular season the same way it stormed through the first six and once again head to the Arizona desert to play for the national championship – with a brief stop in New York City long enough for Pryor to pick up the Heisman Trophy.

At least that was the way it was supposed to be. Now, the Buckeyes and their fans are left not to ponder what might have been but what is. Purdue comes to town tomorrow for homecoming, and while the Boilermakers do not seem to be on par with Wisconsin, they have made a habit of making things interesting against Ohio State teams in the recent past.

The Buckeyes have won four of the last six meetings, but OSU has scored 16 points or fewer in three of those four victories. Last year, the Buckeyes scored 18 and it wasn’t enough against the upset-minded Boilermakers.

But, of course, everything was supposed to change after that game. Everything is always supposed to change after a loss. Too many times this season, I have heard one Buckeye or another say, “We made a lot of mistakes out there but we’ll get those things fixed.”

Yep. Every year, every new team says the same thing – this time things will be different.

And somehow, to nearly everyone’s amazement, it usually turns out the same.

OSU-PURDUE TIDBITS

** This marks the 53rd meeting between Ohio State and Purdue with the Buckeyes holding a 37-13-2 record in the overall series. That includes a 25-5-2 mark in Columbus, including 14 of the last 15. Since 1968, the Boilermakers’ lone victory in Ohio Stadium was a 31-26 decision in the 1988 homecoming game.

** The series began in 1919 but the Buckeyes and Boilermakers have played only sporadically over the years. As a result, Purdue has never beaten Ohio State in back-to-back seasons.

** Ohio State head coach Jim Tressel is 5-2 against the Boilermakers, including a 16-3 victory in 2008 on Purdue’s most recent visit to Columbus. That 13-point win was par for the course. Tressel’s five victories in the series have come by an average margin of 12.4 points.

** Purdue head coach Danny Hope is in his second year with the Boilermakers. He is 1-0 vs. the Buckeyes, making him one of only two Purdue head coaches in history to enjoy a winning record against Ohio State. The other is Cecil Isbell, who coached the Boilermakers from 1944-46. His team took a 35-13 win over the Buckeyes in 1945 and played to a 14-14 tie the following season. Both games were played in Columbus.

** In games following the 21 previous losses during the Tressel era, Ohio State has a 19-2 record. Thirteen of those games were at Ohio Stadium where the Buckeyes are 12-1 following a loss. OSU has dropped back-to-back games only once under Tressel – the team lost three straight in 2004 to Northwestern, Wisconsin and Iowa.

** Ohio State returns to the Horseshoe this week for the annual homecoming game. The Buckeyes are 64-19-5 all-time on homecoming, including 7-2 under Tressel. The lone blemishes are a 20-17 loss to Wisconsin in 2001 and a 13-6 defeat to Penn State in 2008. Last year on homecoming, the Buckeyes posted a 38-7 victory over Minnesota.

** Dating back to last season, Purdue is riding a three-game Big Ten winning streak. The Boilermakers haven’t won four conference games in a row since winning the final three of the 2006 season and their league opener in 2007.

** The Boilermakers are also seeking their first 3-0 start in Big Ten play since 2003. They finished 9-4 overall and 6-2 in the conference that season under head coach Joe Tiller. Purdue hasn’t won that many Big Ten games in a single season since.

** Purdue quarterback Rob Henry is coming off a performance against Minnesota that earned him Big Ten Freshman of the Week honors. During his team’s 28-17 win over the Golden Gophers, Henry accounted for all four Boilermaker touchdowns. He completed 13 of 20 passes for 183 yards and a score, and added 57 yards and three TDs on the ground.

** Purdue features one of the top pass-rushing defenses in college football. The Boilermakers lead the Big Ten with 18 sacks and 45 tackles for loss, and respectively rank 11th and 12th nationally in sacks and TFL.

** Purdue defensive end Ryan Kerrigan is tied for his school’s career record with 12 forced fumbles, a figure that is also No. 2 all-time in the Big Ten. The conference mark of 13 is shared by Illinois linebacker Simeon Rice (1992-95) and Iowa safety Bob Sanders (2000-03).

** Purdue has many distinguished alumni including astronauts Neil Armstrong (the first man to set foot on the moon) and Eugene Cernan (the last man to set to set foot on the moon).

** It’s no understatement that Ohio State needs quarterback Terrelle Pryor to perform well if the Buckeyes expect to win. OSU is 14-1 overall when Pryor rushes for at least one touchdown and 22-1 when he has at least one touchdown pass. Last week in the loss to Wisconsin, Pryor had no rushing touchdowns and no touchdown passes.

** Pryor needs 90 more passing yards to reach 5,000 for his career, and that would make him only the seventh active QB in Division I-A with at least 5,000 yards through the air and 1,000 on the ground. The others are Colin Kaepernick of Nevada, Andy Dalton of TCU, Jake Locker of Washington, Austen Arnaud of Iowa State, Tyrod Taylor of Virginia Tech and Diondre Borel of Utah State.

** Pryor also needs 154 yards of total offense to take over third place on the Ohio State all-time list. He currently sits fourth with 6,730 while Troy Smith (2003-06) is third with 6,888. The school’s top two in total offense are Art Schlichter (8,850, 1978-81) and Bobby Hoying (7,151, 1992-95).

** OSU senior receiver Dane Sanzenbacher needs 46 more yards to crack the school’s all-time top 15. He currently has 1,436 yards while John Frank (1980-83) is 15th with 1,481.

** This week’s game will be telecast once again by the Big Ten Network with an announce crew that should be familiar to Ohio State fans. Eric Collins (play-by-play), Chris Martin (color analysis) and Charissa Thompson (sideline reports) are working their fourth OSU game of the season. Kickoff is set for shortly after 12 noon Eastern.

** The game will also be broadcast on Sirius satellite radio channels 113 and 125 as well as XM channels 102 and 197.

** Next week, Ohio State will get its first look at Minnesota’s two-year-old TCF Bank Stadium. Kickoff is set for 8 p.m. Eastern and the game will be televised by ESPN.

THIS WEEK IN COLLEGE FOOTBALL HISTORY

** On Oct. 20, 1917, Washington beat Whitman College by a 14-6 score, extending its unbeaten streak to 63 games, an NCAA record that still stands.

** On Oct. 20, 1944, Maryland and Michigan State combined for the fewest pass attempts in the modern era of college football during an 8-0 win by the Spartans. The Terrapins threw only one pass during the game while Michigan State attempted none.

** On Oct. 20, 1956, Texas A&M scored a 7-6 upset over No. 4 TCU is what has been called “The Hurricane Game.” Played in 90-mph wins, the Horned Frogs got inside the A&M 5-yard-line three times in the first half but failed to score.

** On Oct. 21, 1989, Alabama QB Gary Hollingsworth set a school record for completions, going 32 for 46 for 379 yards and three touchdowns as the Tide rolled to a 47-30 win over Tennessee.

** On Oct. 21, 2000, Indiana quarterback Antwaan Randle El had a history-making performance during his team’s 51-43 win over Minnesota. Randle El threw for 263 yards and ran for 210 to become the first player in Big Ten history to crack the 200-yard mark in both passing and rushing in the same game.

** On Oct. 21, 2006, Michigan State engineered the biggest comeback in NCAA history, erasing a 38-3 deficit on the way to a 41-38 victory over Northwestern in Evanston.

** On Oct. 22, 1904, Minnesota’s Bobby Marshall set an NCAA record by scoring 72 points during the Golden Gophers’ 146-0 victory over Grinnell (Iowa).

** On Oct. 22, 1983, Nebraska scored 41 points in less than three minutes of possession time on its way to a 69-19 rout of Colorado.

** On Oct. 23, 1965, Virginia Tech was riding high with a new facility and a victory over its instate rivals. The Hokies, known then as the Gobblers, opened their new Lane Stadium with a 22-14 win over Virginia. Tech rushed for 323 yards in the contest, but the decisive touchdown came on a 71-yard pass from quarterback Bobby Owens to receiver Tommy Groom late in the fourth quarter.

** On Oct. 23, 1976, Pittsburgh running back Tony Dorsett pushed his season rushing total past the 1,000-yard mark during a 45-0 victory over Navy. Dorsett became the first running back in NCAA history to post four 1,000-yard seasons, and he also broke the NCAA career rushing record previously held by two-time Heisman Trophy winner Archie Griffin.

** On Oct. 24, 1981, Stanford became the first team in college football history to have two players throw for 250 yards or more in the same game. Steve Cottrell threw for 311 yards while John Elway added 270, but it didn’t do the Cardinal much good. They lost a 62-36 decision to Arizona State.

** On Oct. 25, 1947, Columbia scored a 21-20 upset over Army, ending the Black Knights’ unbeaten streak at 32 games.

** On Oct. 25, 1980, SMU freshman quarterback Lance McIlhenny celebrated his first start by engineering a 20-6 upset of No. 2 Texas in Austin. Halfback Craig James, now a college football analyst for ESPN, ran 53 yards for a touchdown in the third quarter to put the Mustangs ahead for good.

** On Oct. 26, 1985, seventh-ranked BYU saw its 25-game conference winning streak end when UTEP handed the Cougars a 23-16 loss in El Paso. Miners DB Danny Taylor returned a Robbie Bosco interception 100 yards for a touchdown to provide for the winning points.

AROUND THE COUNTRY

** The number of undefeated teams at the Football Bowl Subdivision (Division I-A) level is down to 10. The alphabetical list includes Auburn, Boise State, LSU, Michigan State, Missouri, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, Oregon, TCU and Utah.

** Boise State pushed the nation’s longest current winning streak at 20 with last weekend’s 48-0 stampede over San Jose State. Meanwhile, Western Kentucky remains on the other side of the spectrum. The Hilltoppers squandered a 24-7 lead after three quarters and wound up with a 35-30 loss to Louisiana-Monroe, extending the nation’s longest losing streak to 26 games.

** When it ascended to the No. 1 spot in this week’s Associated Press poll, Oregon became the 43rd team to hold the top spot in the media poll which began ranking college football teams in 1936. The last time a team was No. 1 for the first time was Virginia, which rose to the top spot on Oct. 14, 1990.

** The Ducks’ 60-13 win over UCLA last night avoided something that hasn’t happened in 50 years. Oregon protected its top ranking in the Associated Press writers’ poll after former No. 1s Alabama and Ohio State had gone down in successive weeks. The last time the AP No. 1 team lost in three consecutive weeks was November 1960 when Iowa, Minnesota and Missouri fell in succession.

** Michigan State has won its first seven games for the first time since opening the 1966 season with nine victories in a row. The Spartans are also off to 7-0 start for only the sixth time in school history. Four of the five previous times Michigan State began a season with seven wins, the team brought home a national championship.

** Last week’s 10-7 loss to Mississippi State marked the third defeat in a row for Florida, something that hasn’t happened in Gainesville since 1988 when the Gators lost four in a row under then head coach Galen Hall. (That’s the same Hall who has been Joe Paterno’s offensive coordinator at Penn State since 2004.) Florida head coach Urban Meyer is also navigating uncharted waters. Meyer has never before experienced a three-game losing streak in his head coaching career that began at Bowling Green in 2001.

** Boise State continues to lose even when it wins. Despite a 48-0 pounding of San Jose State, the Broncos’ strength of schedule took another hit Saturday night when No. 19 Nevada dropped a 27-21 decision at unranked Hawaii. It was the Wolf Pack’s first loss this season but their sixth straight to the Rainbow Warriors in Honolulu since joining the WAC in 2000.

** Since Rich Rodriguez became head coach at Michigan, the Wolverines have lost 15 of their 19 conference games. Michigan hasn’t suffered through that kind of futility in Big Ten play for more than 70 years. U-M dropped 16 of 18 league contests during a stretch between 1934 and 1937.

** Indiana head coach Bill Lynch will be gunning for career victory No. 100 tomorrow when his Hoosiers travel to Illinois. Lynch’s 17-year coaching résumé contains 36 wins at Butler, 37 at Ball State, eight at DePauw and 18 at Indiana.

** The supposed top three in this week’s Heisman Trophy race: Auburn quarterback Cameron Newton, Oregon running back LaMichael James and Boise State quarterback Kellen Moore. I’m going to go out on a limb and predict none of those three will win the award. Who would top my ballot if I had to turn it in today? I honestly have no idea.

** Probably the best player in America you’ve never heard of plays for Troy. He is receiver Jerrel Jernigan, who returned a punt 75 yards for a touchdown and caught the game-winning TD in the Trojans’ 31-24 win over Louisiana-Lafayette. Jernigan leads the Sun Belt and ranks fifth nationally with 178.3 all-purpose yards per game.

** Miami (Ohio) will unveil its first three “Cradle of Coaches” statues tomorrow before the game against Ohio University, honoring outstanding former players who went on to distinguished coaching careers. Carmen Cozza, Paul Dietzel and the late Weeb Eubank will be the first three former Miami players honored. Next season, the RedHawks will unveil statues of the late Earl “Red” Blaik, Ara Parseghian and the late Bo Schembechler.

** Speaking of Parseghian, he also coached at Northwestern before becoming an icon at Notre Dame and he has been invited by current head coach Pat Fitzgerald to give a pregame talk to the Wildcats before tomorrow afternoon’s game against Michigan State.

** Another bowl game has changed sponsors. The GMAC Bowl, scheduled for Jan. 6 and featuring Mid-American Conference and Sun Belt teams, will henceforth be known as the GoDaddy.com Bowl. Obviously, that means there will be copious amounts of commercials featuring racecar driver Danica Patrick during the telecast. I’ll leave it to you to decide if that’s a good thing or not.

FEARLESS FORECAST

Missing only the two big upsets of the week – Texas over No. 4 Nebraska and Wisconsin over top-ranked Ohio State – the straight-up picks posted an 8-2 record that puts the yearly mark at 65-11. Against the spread, we kept rolling right along with an identical 8-2 mark and that pushes us to a lofty 46-27-3 ATS for the season.

Here are the games we like this week. (Rankings are now BCS standings.)

SATURDAY’S GAMES

No. 7 Michigan State at Northwestern: Are the Spartans for real? We may get a little better handle on that question this week when they play outside their home state for the first time all season. MSU has a nice blend of offense and defense, including two of the best players in the Big Ten. Quarterback Kirk Cousins (1,617 yards, 11 TDs) has thrown at least one touchdown pass in 14 straight games while linebacker Greg Jones was named national defensive player of the week for his performance during Sparty’s 26-6 win over Illinois. Michigan State beat Northwestern last season, 24-14 in East Lansing, but the Spartans would do well not to overlook the Wildcats. Dual-threat quarterback Dan Persa (1,663 yards, 10 TDs) leads the country with his 78.0 percent completion rate, and NU took last week off to prepare. Still, Northwestern remains suspect at times on defense and that should make the difference … Michigan State 31, Northwestern 23. (12 noon ET, ESPN)

Duke at No. 25 Virginia Tech: Since being left for dead following season-opening losses to Boise State and I-AA James Madison, the Hokies have become a pretty good football team. They have won five in a row by an average of about three touchdowns per game and have averaged 41.2 points every time out. That kind of performance should probably continue this week against the Blue Devils, who have quarterback problems. Sophomore Sean Renfree (1,621 yards, 10 TDs) is the starter, but he has thrown 14 interceptions in the past five games. Not coincidentally, Duke has lost all five. The Hokies lead the all-time series by a 10-7 margin but that’s a little deceiving since they’ve won the last nine in a row … Virginia Tech 31, Duke 10. (12 noon ET, ACC Network)

No. 6 LSU at No. 4 Auburn: The number of undefeated teams will be reduced by one in this matchup of SEC rivals who have reached 7-0 in much different ways. The Bayou Bengals have had several cardiac finishes while the War Eagles have tried to bludgeon opponents with Heisman Trophy candidate Cam Newton at quarterback. While Newton has passed and rushed for a combined 2,138 yards and 25 TDs, LSU head coach Les Miles has employed a two-quarterback system with Jordan Jefferson and Jarrett Lee. Maybe it doesn’t matter since both QBs have beaten Auburn during their careers – Lee two years ago and Jefferson last year. The onus will be on the LSU defense to try and stop Newton, who hasn’t lost a game as a starting QB since leading Blinn College (Texas) to last year’s JUCO national championship … Auburn 23, LSU 18. (3:30 p.m. ET, CBS)

No. 13 Wisconsin at No. 15 Iowa: Now that the Badgers have had their way with the Ohio State defense, they must travel to Iowa City to take on the Hawkeyes, who rank sixth nationally in scoring defense (13.2 points per game) and seventh against the run (83.3 yards). Wisconsin should roll into Kinnick Stadium with plenty of confidence but the Badgers never seem to be at their best there. Iowa has won three of the last four in the series at Kinnick and held UW’s potent offense to an average of only 12.5 points in those games. It may come down to the quarterback play between Wisconsin’s Scott Tolzien and Ricky Stanzi of Iowa. Both complete around 70 percent of their passes and have combined to throw only five interceptions in 293 attempts this season. Buckle your chinstraps because this ought to be a good one … Iowa 20, Wisconsin 17. (3:30 p.m. ET, ABC/ESPN)

Washington State at No. 12 Stanford: This has all the makings of a blowout if the Cardinal can simply retain their focus. They had last week off to savor a 37-35 victory over USC, a win during which sophomore quarterback Andrew Luck went 20 of 24 passing for 285 yards and three touchdowns. Luck directs an offense that averages 43.3 points and 471.0 yards per game, figures that respectively rank fifth and 12th nationally. On the other side of the line of scrimmage, the Cougars surrender 40.1 points and 493.9 yards per contest. Those figures respectively rank 118th and 120th out of 120 schools playing Division I-A football. The final score in this one all depends upon Stanford head coach Jim Harbaugh and how big a statement he wants to make … Stanford 45, Washington State 13. (5 p.m. ET, FCS)

Eastern Michigan at Virginia: Just in case you missed it, the Eagles and head coach Ron English celebrated their first victory together last week with a 41-38 overtime win over Ball State. QB Alex Gillett, who turned in an admirable performance earlier this season against Ohio State, exploded for 414 yards of total offense and five touchdowns as EMU snapped an 18-game losing streak. Now, it’s back to reality and a trip to Charlottesville to face the struggling Cavaliers in their first year under head coach Mike London. Since beating up on VMI at the end of September, Virginia has lost three in a row by an average of 22.0 points per game. The Cavs’ offense has been sputtering, but you would have to believe a mid-level ACC team can still put some points on the board against the worst defense in the MAC … Virginia 34, Eastern Michigan 21. (6 p.m. ET, ESPN3)

Colorado State at No. 9 Utah: The Utes would like to elbow their way alongside Boise State and TCU into the national title conversation, but they’re going to have to do a better job than they did last week. During a rather lackluster 30-6 win over Wyoming, Utah turned the ball over three more times to give the team 12 for the season. Coupled with only six takeaways by their defense, the Utes are a lowly 108th nationally in turnover margin. They are certainly going to have to shore up that part of their game before welcoming TCU to Salt Lake City in two weeks, especially since the Horned Frogs rank No. 16 in turnover margin. This week, however, Utah shouldn’t have to worry much. The Rams have turned the ball over 13 times themselves while their pass efficiency defense ranks dead last in the nation … Utah 45, Colorado State 13. (6 p.m. ET, The Mtn.)

No. 8 Alabama at Tennessee: Even though the Volunteers are 2-4 overall and 0-3 in the SEC, expect them to get Alabama’s full attention. Last year, the Crimson Tide barely escaped with a 12-10 victory that was secured only after DT Terrence Cody blocked a 44-yard field goal attempt at the end of the game. Most observers believe ’Bama will cruise this time around but the defending national champions have had their problems the last couple of weeks. Their vaunted ground game is stuck in second gear and their pressure defense has produced only eight sacks in seven games. Still, Tennessee is struggling so mightily on both offense and defense that it shouldn’t make any difference … Alabama 31, Tennessee 7. (7 p.m. ET, ESPN)

Purdue at No. 10 Ohio State: As the Buckeyes try to pick up the pieces from last week’s loss at Wisconsin, they have an opponent coming to Columbus for homecoming they had better not overlook. Obviously, the Boilermakers scored a huge 26-18 upset over Ohio State last season but there is every reason to believe Purdue is better now than it was then. The Boilermakers try to spread the field on offense much more than they have in the past – sort of a Michigan Lite if you will – and try to let redshirt freshman QB Rob Henry make a play. So far, so good, since Henry has 399 yards of total offense and five touchdowns in his team’s Big Ten victories over Northwestern and Minnesota. Meanwhile, OSU defenders are dropping like flies as top tackler Ross Homan is sidelined with a foot injury and nickel back Christian Bryant is out with a foot infection that required surgery. A much better performance than last week is paramount for both the Ohio State defensive line and quarterback Terrelle Pryor, or the Buckeyes had better be on upset alert again … Ohio State 34, Purdue 20. (12 noon ET, BTN)

Here are the spreads for the above games: Michigan State (-5) at Northwestern; Duke (+27) at Virginia Tech; LSU (+6) at Auburn; Wisconsin (+6) at Iowa; Washington State (+35) at Stanford; Eastern Michigan (+24½) at Virginia; Colorado State at Utah (-30); Alabama (-16) at Tennessee; Purdue (+24) at Ohio State.

Enjoy the games and we’ll chat again next week.

Buckeyes Merely Need To Take Care Of Business

If there is one sure thing about college football, it is that there is no such thing as a sure thing.

“One week you’re drinking the wine, the next week you’re stomping the grapes” was one of former Ohio State head coach John Cooper’s all-time great sayings and Ol’ Coop sure knew what he was talking about.

Over the course of a few short hours last Saturday, the college football landscape turned upside down as one head-scratcher after another revealed itself.

South Carolina turned defending national champion Alabama from an invincible dynasty-in-the-making to just another one-loss team. Meanwhile, Michigan State exposed seemingly superhuman Michigan quarterback Denard Robinson as just another Clark Kent, and lowly Illinois took advantage of several Penn State mistakes to post an unlikely 33-13 victory over the Nittany Lions, who were celebrating homecoming in Happy Valley.

Making those outcomes even more astounding was the historical significance of each game.

Before its 35-21 win over Alabama, South Carolina had never beaten a top-ranked team in four previous tries. Michigan State’s 34-17 win over Michigan was the Spartans’ third straight over their in-state rivals, and they haven’t enjoyed a three-peat in the series since 1965-67. And the Fighting Illini won for the first time in seven trips all-time to Happy Valley, and Joe Paterno lost for only the sixth time in 45 homecomings.

Want more proof of how topsy-turvy college football can be from week to week? On Sept. 18, California was brutalized by upstart Nevada of the WAC during a 52-31 blowout. One week later, UCLA traveled to Austin and handed then No. 7 Texas a 34-12 loss, the worst home defeat for the Longhorns since Mack Brown took over as head coach in 1998. So what happened when Cal and UCLA got together Oct. 9 for a Pac-10 showdown in Berkeley? The Bears raced out to a 28-0 first-half lead before putting the Bruins away by a 35-7 final.

What’s the point of all this? Simply a few cautionary tales for the suddenly No. 1-ranked Ohio State football team who would do well to remember another Coop-ism: “About the time you’re feeling pretty good about yourself, it’s time to check your hole card.”

There is little doubt in my mind that Ohio State deserves to be ranked the No. 1 team in the nation. I have maintained since the team’s Rose Bowl win over Oregon that I fully expect the Buckeyes to be playing for the national championship come next January. Now, halfway through the 2010 regular season, there is no reason to change my mind. Every team that remains on the schedule has been exposed in one way or another, and OSU will be favored – and rightfully so – in each of those final six games.

Wisconsin has been susceptible to the pass all season, and the Badgers allowed Michigan State QB Kirk Cousins to throw for 269 yards and three touchdowns. No offense to Cousins, but I’d take Terrelle Pryor over him every day of the week and twice on Saturdays.

Purdue has been decimated on offense by injuries and Ohio State will be seeking revenge for last year’s upset loss. Minnesota could be the worst team in the Big Ten right now, and a rebuilding Penn State might not be that much better than the Gophers.

That leaves Iowa and archrival Michigan.

The Hawkeyes have lost 11 of their last 12 against OSU as well as 14 of their last 17 to the Buckeyes in Kinnick Stadium, and the jury remains out on whether the Wolverines are truly back or not. They looked pretty good early last season, too, before finishing 5-7.

Of course, the national naysayers would have everyone believe the Buckeyes are too flawed to be a legitimate No. 1 team. Many of them are picking Wisconsin to upset OSU tomorrow night. The pompous prattlers believe there are too many underlying issues with Ohio State including an offensive line that is perceived to be underachieving, a relatively punchless running game, injuries that are depleting the defensive secondary and the ticking time bomb that is kickoff and punt coverage.

Granted, I have been among the chronic complainers about all of the aforementioned warts and blemishes. But it could very well be a case of nitpicking at unrealistic expectations.

The Buckeyes are currently the No. 6 team in the nation in scoring offense, so the offensive line must be doing something right. It may also interest you to know that the lackluster run game is generating 217.3 yards per game, and that ranks 20th in the country.

Season-ending injuries to C.J. Barnett and Tyler Moeller were bitter pills to swallow, but the OSU defense continues to soldier on and excel. It ranks third nationally in total defense and is the country’s sixth-toughest unit to score on.

And then there are the kick coverage units. Since allowing a 99-yard kickoff return to Ohio’s Julian Posey – a touchdown that was wiped out by a penalty – the Buckeyes have not only shored up their coverage, they have shut down the opposition. Over the past three games, they have allowed an average of only 15.8 yards on 24 kickoffs, and the punt coverage has been even better. Eastern Michigan, Illinois and Indiana averaged 2.4 yards on 10 punts.

Every team at every competitive level in every competitive sport has some flaws, and Ohio State has its share. But if the Buckeyes can simply play to the level of their own talent – and not down to the level of their competition – they can not only march their way to the national championship game, they can win it no matter the opponent.

They simply have to keep in mind how much better it is to drink the wine than to stomp the grapes.

OSU-WISCONSIN TIDBITS

** This marks the 76th meeting of Ohio State and Wisconsin, and the Buckeyes hold a decidedly lopsided 53-17-5 record in the overall series including 24-10-2 in Madison. OSU has won four of its last five trips to Camp Randall Stadium. Since 1999, however, the series has been tight with the Buckeyes holding a slight 5-4 advantage.

** Ohio State head coach Jim Tressel is in his 10th season with the Buckeyes. He has an 100-21 overall record, including 4-3 against Wisconsin. He is 61-13 in the Big Ten and 35-14 against ranked teams. The Badgers are ranked No. 16 in this week’s USA Today coaches’ poll as well as the Harris Interactive Poll. They are No. 18 in the Associated Press writers’ poll.

** Wisconsin head coach Bret Bielema is in his fifth season with the Badgers. He has a 43-15 overall record, including 0-3 against Ohio State. He is 21-13 in the Big Ten and 5-10 against ranked teams. That includes an 0-4 mark against teams ranked in the top 10. The Buckeyes are ranked No. 1 this week in all three national polls.

** With 43 wins, Bielema is already sixth all-time in career victories among Wisconsin head coaches. He needs only four more to move into fourth place past Dave McClain (46, 1978-85) and Harry Stuhldreher (45, 1936-48). Barry Alvarez (1990-2005) is the school’s all-time winningest coach with 118 victories.

** Wisconsin hasn’t had much success over the years against top-ranked teams. The Badgers are 14-58-2 all-time against top-five opponents, a mark that includes 3-16 against teams ranked No. 1. However, all three of Wisconsin’s victories against top-ranked teams have come at Camp Randall Stadium.

** The last time the Badgers played a No. 1 team was in 2007 when they lost a 38-17 decision to Ohio State in Columbus. The last time Wisconsin beat a No. 1 team came in the 1981 season opener when the Badgers handed Michigan a 21-14 upset loss in Madison.

** The Buckeyes made their 94th appearance at the No. 1 spot in the AP poll this week, the third-highest total since the AP began ranking college football teams in 1936. Only Oklahoma (98) and Notre Dame (95) have been atop the poll more.

** Ohio State has an all-time record of 66-11-1 playing as the nation’s No. 1-ranked team.

** Wisconsin has played Ohio State six times when the Buckeyes were ranked No. 1 and have a 1-5 record in those games. The only UW victory came in 1942 when the Badgers took a 17-7 win at Camp Randall Stadium in what has become known as “The Bad Water Game.” Several members of the OSU squad became ill after drinking tainted water on the train to Madison and the game wound up as the only blemish on the Buckeyes’ 1942 record. They still went on to win the school’s first-ever national championship that year.

** In the Tressel era, Ohio State is 13-6 on the road against ranked teams. The Buckeyes also have an eight-game winning streak in Big Ten road games against teams ranked in the AP top 25.

** Ohio State has won 19 of its last 20 conference road games. The only blemish during that streak was last year’s 26-18 upset loss to Purdue last season.

** OSU has a 27-13 record away from home in night games. Under Tressel, the Buckeyes are 16-10 after dark overall and that includes an 8-3 mark in Big Ten night games played on the road.

** Wisconsin has won 40 of its last 44 games at Camp Randall Stadium. That includes 13 of the last 14 with the only blemish a 20-10 loss to Iowa last season.

** The Badgers will be trying to get an early upper hand in the game. They are 32-4 under Bielema when they score first.

** Former All-America receiver Lee Evans will serve as honorary captain for the Badgers. Evans caught a 79-yard touchdown pass to give Wisconsin a 17-10 victory over Ohio State in 2003, a night game at Camp Randall that snapped the Buckeyes’ 19-game winning streak.

** As it has been so many times in this series, the game will feature a classic matchup between the irresistible force and the immovable object. Wisconsin ranks second in the Big Ten in rushing with an average of 240.8 yards per game while Ohio State ranks second in the conference against the run, surrendering an average of only 78.7 yards per contest.

** Wisconsin has been pretty good against the run this year as well. The Badgers rank third in the Big Ten, giving up an average of 108.2 yards per game, and they have allowed just one rushing touchdown so far in six games.

** In Tressel’s 121 games with the Buckeyes, opposing teams have totaled 175 or more yards on the ground only 11 times. Wisconsin has three of those 11 performances, including 179 two years ago during a 20-17 loss to Ohio State in Madison.

** UW quarterback Scott Tolzien is completing 69.7 percent of his attempts so far this season and his career percentage of 65.8 is the best in school history. Tolzien has the third-best career completion percentage among active Division I-A quarterbacks who have played 20 games or more. Only Case Keenum of Houston (68.9) and Kellen Moore of Boise State (66.8) rank ahead of the Wisconsin QB.

** You should not expect a shutout in tomorrow night’s game. Wisconsin hasn’t been shut out since a 34-0 loss to Syracuse in the 1997 season opener and the Buckeyes haven’t been blanked since a 28-0 loss at Michigan in the 1993 regular-season finale.

** Wisconsin has 13 Ohio natives on its roster. Ohio State has no Wisconsin-born players.

** Camp Randall Stadium, which opened in 1917, is the fourth-oldest on-campus stadium in Division I-A. The only older facilities are Bobby Dodd Stadium at Georgia Tech (1913), Davis Wade Stadium at Mississippi State (1914) and Nippert Stadium at Cincinnati (1916).

** With last week’s win over Indiana, Ohio State became one of only seven bowl-eligible teams so far this season. The others are Auburn, LSU, Michigan State, Nevada, Oregon and TCU.

** Wisconsin senior David Gilreath is one of the most prolific kickoff return men in Big Ten history. He already holds the conference record with 116 career kickoff returns and is third all-time in kickoff return yardage with 2,514. Derrick Mason of Michigan State (1993-96) is the Big Ten career leader with 2,575 yards on kickoff returns.

** With 315 yards of total offense last week against Indiana, Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor increased his career total to 6,518 and moved past Steve Bellisari (6,496, 1998-2001) into fourth place on the school’s career list in that category. The top three are Art Schlichter (8,850, 1978-81), Bobby Hoying (7,151, 1992-95) and Troy Smith (6,888, 2003-06).

** With his sixth career game of 300 or more yards of total offense, Pryor tied the school record set by Joe Germaine (1996-98).

** Pryor also increased his career passing yardage to 4,754 and pushed his way past Craig Krenzel (4,493, 2000-03) into ninth place on the school’s all-time list. Jim Karsatos (5,089, 1984-86) is currently eighth.

** OSU kicker Devin Barclay is currently tied for the nation’s third-longest streak of consecutive games with at least one field goal. Barclay has had at least one field goal in seven straight games. Georgia kicker Blair Walsh is first with 14 in a row while Dustin Hopkins of Florida State is second with eight. Danny Hrapmann of Southern Mississippi and Collin Wager of Penn State are tied with Barclay at seven.

** This week’s game will be telecast by ESPN with the marquee primetime announce crew of Brent Musberger (play-by-play), Kirk Herbstreit (color analysis) and Erin Andrews (sideline reports). The game will also be telecast by ESPN3-D with Dave Lamont, Tim Brown and Ray Bentley on the call. Kickoff is set for shortly after 7 p.m. Eastern. (That is 6 p.m. local time if you’re in Madison.)

** Madison will this week’s site of ESPN’s College GameDay, which begins at 9 a.m. Eastern on ESPNU and continues at 10 a.m. on ESPN.

** The game will also be broadcast on Sirius satellite radio channels 90 and 122 as well as XM channels 143 and 196. Sports Radio USA will also broadcast the game with Rich Cellini and former Northwestern head coach Gary Barnett on the call.

** Next week, Ohio State returns to Ohio Stadium to Purdue in the annual homecoming game. Kickoff is set for 12 noon Eastern and the game will be televised by the Big Ten Network.

THIS WEEK IN COLLEGE FOOTBALL HISTORY

** On Oct. 11, 1975, Division II schools Lenoir-Rhyne (N.C.) and Davidson (N.C.) College combined to set an NCAA single-game rushing record as the Bears topped the Wildcats, 69-14. Lenoir-Rhyne rushed for an amazing 837 yards while Davidson added 202, establishing a new NCAA record with 1,039 combined rushing yards on 111 attempts.

** On Oct. 12, 2002, Northern Illinois trailed Miami (Ohio) by a 27-14 score entering the fourth quarter. The Huskies proceeded to score 34 points in the final period to rally for a 48-41 victory, establishing a MAC record for most points scored in a fourth-quarter comeback win.

** On Oct. 13, 2007, Houston became the only team in NCAA history to have a 300-yard receiver and a 200-yard rusher in the same game as the Cougars scored a wild 56-48 victory over Rice. Houston wide receiver Donnie Avery caught 13 passes for 346 yards – a school and Conference USA record – while tailback Anthony Aldridge added 205 yards rushing.

** On Oct. 14, 1978, Cornell running back Joe Holland rushed for 244 yards on an Ivy League-record 55 carries to lead the Big Red to a 25-20 victory at Harvard.

** On Oct. 15, 1910, officials at the University of Illinois decided it would be a good idea to invite alumni back to the campus for a football game. More than 1,500 returned to Champaign and watched as the Fighting Illini beat Chicago, 3-0, in what is recognized as the first official homecoming game in college football history.

** On Oct. 15, 2005, USC quarterback Matt Leinart was pushed across the goal line in the final seconds by teammate Reggie Bush and the top-ranked Trojans escaped South Bend with a 34-31 win over No. 9 Notre Dame. The play has come to be known as the “Bush Push.”

** On Oct. 16, 1976, Texas A&M kicker Tony Franklin showcased his strong right leg and set an NCAA record in the process. Franklin became the first kicker in college football history to boot a pair of field goals from 60 yards or longer in the same game. He had three-pointers of 64 and 65 yards during a 24-0 victory over Baylor in College Station. Franklin’s 65-yarder established a new NCAA record for the longest field goal in college football history, but the mark didn’t last long. Later that same day, Abilene Christian kicker Ove Johansson booted a 69-yarder against East Texas State. Johansson’s record still stands.

** On Oct. 17, 1970, Southern Miss went into Oxford and engineered a 30-14 upset over fourth-ranked Mississippi and Heisman Trophy candidate Archie Manning.

** On Oct. 18, 1958, No. 2 Auburn’s 17-game winning streak came to an end with a 7-7 tie against unranked Georgia Tech. The Tigers went on to close the 1958 season with six straight victories, but the tie with the Yellow Jackets cost Auburn a second consecutive national championship.

AROUND THE COUNTRY

** The number of undefeated teams at the Football Bowl Subdivision (Division I-A) level is down to a lucky 13. Alphabetically they are Auburn, Boise State, LSU, Michigan State, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, Ohio State, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, Oregon, TCU and Utah.

** With Alabama’s loss last weekend, Boise State now owns the nation’s longest current winning streak at 19. Western Kentucky, which lost a 28-21 decision Oct. 9 to previously winless Florida International, ran its losing nation-long losing streak to 25.

** Michigan State has started 6-0 for the first time since 1999 and will be looking for a win this week against Illinois to push that mark to 7-0. The Spartans haven’t won that many games to start a season since they were 9-0 at the beginning of the 1966 campaign, a season that resulted in the second of their back-to-back national championships under head coach Hugh “Duffy” Daugherty.

** The Big Ten leads all conferences with five quarterbacks currently ranked among the nation’s top 12 in pass efficiency. Rick Stanzi of Iowa, who leads the conference and is third nationally, is followed Dan Persa of Northwestern (fourth), Ohio State’s Terrelle Pryor (sixth), Kirk Cousins of Michigan State (ninth) and Michigan’s Denard Robinson (12th). The SEC has four quarterbacks ranked among the top 12 while the WAC, Pac-10 and Big 12 have one each.

** TCU has been one of the top defensive teams in the country for several years but the Horned Frogs accomplished a rare feat last weekend with their 45-0 win over Wyoming. It was TCU’s second straight shutout, something that hasn’t occurred for that program in 55 years. The Frogs last posted back-to-back shutouts in 1955 when they blanked Texas Tech, Arkansas and Alabama in succession on their way to the Southwest Conference championship.

** Is LSU a team of destiny or are the Tigers getting by on pure luck? Half of their wins have come cardiac style – a goal-line stand against North Carolina, a last-second penalty against Tennessee and a favorable review following a fake field goal against Florida. The Bengals from the Bayou should have no trouble getting to 7-0 since they play I-AA McNeese State this week. After that, it’s make or break time – at Auburn on Oct. 23 and home with Alabama on Nov. 6.

** There was no luck involved in Utah’s 68-27 dismantling of Iowa State last week. The Utes piled up a staggering 1,026 yards when you add their total offense to kickoff, punt and interception returns.

** Congratulations to Army, Air Force and Navy. The military academics are currently 12-5 after victories by all three last Saturday. Air Force (5-1) rolled to a 49-27 win over Colorado State, Army (4-2) went on the road to take a 41-23 victory over Tulane, and Navy (3-2) scored a touchdown with 26 seconds remaining to squeeze out a 28-27 win at Wake Forest. The key to the academies’ success this season? Running the football. Air Force is No. 1 nationally in rushing while Army is No. 9 and Navy is No. 10. By the way, the last time all three service academies finished the season with winning records was 1999.

** Congratulations also to South Carolina. When the Gamecocks knocked off top-rated Alabama, it completed a rare trifecta for the school. In the same calendar year, the SC basketball team defeated No. 1 Kentucky and the baseball team downed top-ranked Arizona State. The only school to knock off No. 1 teams in those three sports in the same calendar year was Florida in 2007.

** Figure this one out (if you can): In its first five games, Alabama averaged 229.8 yards per game on the ground. In its previous game before upsetting the Crimson Tide last week, South Carolina gave up 334 rushing yards to Auburn. Then last Saturday, Alabama had only 36 yards on the ground.

** Call it the power of television. Boise State received 138 new student applications after its Sept. 25 football game against Oregon State was broadcast nationally in primetime by ABC. That may seem like a modest number but it was nearly double the amount received by the school after a typical weekend.

** The team you don’t want to play after they’ve had a week off? Oklahoma. The Sooners are 14-3 under head coach Bob Stoops after a week off and that includes a perfect 12-0 mark at home. Bear that in mind if you’re thinking Iowa State has a chance to go into Norman this week and pull the upset. OU had last week off after a 28-20 victory over Texas on Oct. 2. One more thing: The Sooners are also 11-0 during Stoops’ tenure in games that have immediately followed the Red River Shootout.

** The Pasadena City Council on Monday approved a $152 million renovation plan for the 88-year-old Rose Bowl stadium. Construction will run in three phases beginning in January and ending in 2013 to avoid disrupting games. The number of luxury seats will be increased from about 550 to 2,500, and the facility will get a new scoreboard, safety improvements, more restrooms and more concession stands. The city plans to pay for the upgrade with federal stimulus funds, a bond issue, money from the Tournament of Roses and profits from previous games.

** Kent State will honor former quarterback Josh Cribbs on Oct. 30 by retiring his No. 9 jersey. Cribbs, who holds the NFL record with eight kickoff returns for touchdowns, set several marks during his four seasons with the Golden Flashes from 2001-04, including the career passing record with 7,169 yards. Cribbs will be only the fourth former Kent player to have his jersey retired. The others are running back Eric Wilkerson (40), Canadian Football Hall of Fame defensive end Jim Corrigall (79) and Pro Hall of Fame linebacker Jack Lambert (99).

** Also taking advantage of the Cleveland Browns’ off week will be the University of Texas, which plans to retire the jersey No. 12 worn by former quarterback Colt McCoy on Oct. 30. The Longhorns’ career leader in touchdown passes and passing yardage, McCoy will become the sixth Texas player to have his number retired. The others – quarterback Vince Young (10), Heisman Trophy winners Earl Campbell (20) and Ricky Williams (34), Pro Football Hall of Fame quarterback Bobby Layne (22) and College Football Hall of Fame linebacker Tommy Nobis (60).

** NAIA rivals Union College (Ky.) and Bethel University (Tenn.) had a good old-fashioned shootout last Saturday that featured 139 points and 1,501 yards of total offense. When the dust finally settled, Union had scored an 84-55 victory behind tailback Armond Smith, who rushed for 312 yards and five touchdowns on only 16 carries. Amazingly, the combined point total was not an NAIA record. That was set at 141 in 1994 when Southwestern College (Kan.) scored a 79-62 victory over Sterling (Kan.) College.

** The initial BCS standings of the 2010 season will be released Sunday. They will be revealed on ESPN at 8:15 p.m. Eastern. And just so you know: Only six of 12 times has the team ranked No. 1 in the first BCS standings of the season gone on to play in the national championship game.

FEARLESS FORECAST

It was wild last weekend across the college football landscape with plenty of upsets. We still managed to perform fairly well but slipped to a season-low 9-4 week straight up that puts the yearly ledger at 57-9. Against the spread, we were back above water again with an 8-5 mark. The ATS scoreboard is now a pretty stellar 38-25-3 for the season.

Here are the games we’ll be watching this week.

SATURDAY’S GAMES

Boston College at No. 16 Florida State: Would you believe the Seminoles are the highest ranked team in Florida this week for the first time since 2005? That’s right. After rolling to a 45-17 victory over Miami (Fla.) last weekend, the Fighting Jimbos are looking at their best start in five years. On the other side of the field will be the Eagles, who are headed in the opposite direction. BC has lost three in a row, its longest losing streak since losing six straight in 1998. What’s worse is that the Eagles haven’t even been in any of those three games, losing to Virginia Tech, Notre Dame and North Carolina State by a combined score of 94-30. Those are all decent teams but none that would be confused for a powerhouse this year, so it stands to reason BC’s struggles will continue when it visits Tallahassee … Florida State 31, Boston College 14. (12 noon ET, ESPN)

Illinois at No. 13 Michigan State: The next time someone tries to explain away a loss because a team was distracted, bring up the Spartans. How much more of a distraction can you have than your head coach suffering a midseason heart attack and being away from his full-time duties? That is exactly what has happened with Mark Dantonio, and yet his team is off to its best start since 1999. This week the Spartans will try to keep things going against the upstart Fighting Illini, who played Ohio State tough two weeks and took Penn State to the woodshed last week. This should be a battle of strong defenses with veteran MSU quarterback Kirk Cousins figuring to outplay freshman counterpart Nathan Scheelhaase of Illinois … Michigan State 23, Illinois 13. (12 noon ET, BTN)

Texas at No. 5 Nebraska: How good are the Cornhuskers? We don’t really know for sure because although they have rolled to a 5-0 start by outscoring their opponents, 208-64, Nebraska has played five teams with a combined 10-15 record. How much of a step up in competition does Bo Pelini’s team take this week? Again, we really don’t know for sure. The Longhorns are unranked for the first time since 2000 and staring at their first three-game regular-season losing streak since 1997. One thing we do know for sure: Nebraska has had this game circled ever since a 12-10 loss to Texas in last year’s Big 12 Championship Game. The Longhorns have won eight of the past nine meetings in the series, but history isn’t going to be of much help to the Mack Attack this time around … Nebraska 41, Texas 17. (3:30 p.m. ET, ABC/ESPN)

No. 15 Iowa at Michigan: The Wolverines get a shot at redemption this week after their high-flying offense was grounded last week in a 34-24 loss to Michigan State. Unfortunately for U-M, the Hawkeyes come to Ann Arbor with a defense that is one of the best in college football. Iowa ranks No. 1 in scoring defense and No. 4 in total defense, allowing only 10.2 points and 242.2 yards per game. Michigan QB Denard Robinson cannot afford to make the mistakes he made last week and expect to do anything against the Hawkeyes. He led a second-half comeback last year against Iowa, but threw a pick in the final minute before the Hawkeyes finally salted away a 30-28 victory. Could it be that close again this year? Michigan is 23-5-3 at home against the Hawkeyes and has won 11 of the last 15 in the overall series. But it’s just difficult to believe the Wolverines can find enough holes in that Iowa defense to outscore the Hawkeyes … Iowa 27, Michigan 21. (3:30 p.m. ET, ABC/ESPN)

No. 10 Utah at Wyoming: You think potential BCS busters Boise State or TCU get no respect? How about the Utes? They have been bludgeoning opponents without remorse the past couple of weeks, averaging 60.0 points over their last three games. Of course, their marquee win so far is a 27-24 victory over an underachieving Pittsburgh team, so maybe Utah is getting more respect than it deserves. On the field, things don’t figure to be much different this week as the Cowboys should be the Utes’ latest victim. They have already played Boise and TCU, losing those games by a combined score of 96-6. Wyoming has one of the worst attacks in college football this year, ranking 120th of 120 Division I-A teams in rushing and total offense and 118th in scoring. It all spells blowout … Utah 62, Wyoming 6. (6 p.m. ET, The Mtn.)

McNeese State at No. 9 LSU: Thanks to some good fortune – some would say divine intervention – the Tigers have managed to claw their way to six victories in as many games and need a win this week for the program’s best start since 1973. Lost amid all the talk of how lucky LSU has been is the fact that Les Miles has himself a pretty stout defense. The Tigers rank fifth nationally in total defense and sixth against the run, allowing an average of only 80.7 yards per game. That doesn’t bode well for their Division I-AA opponents, who will be without leading rusher Marcus Wiltz, who has undergone season-ending knee surgery. After all those close calls the past couple of weeks, the Bayou Bengals should be able to breathe a little easier this week … LSU 34, McNeese State 3. (7 p.m. ET, FSN Regional)

Iowa State at No. 6 Oklahoma: The Sooners are flying under the BCS radar – as much as the undefeated No. 6 team in the nation can fly under the radar. It could be that OU hasn’t exactly been dazzling so far, winning four of its five games by eight points or fewer. For some reason, the Sooners aren’t getting much out of their running attack even though senior tailback DeMarco Murray (551 yards, nine TDs) is generally regarded as a future NFL star. Murray should be able to find some holes this week since the Cyclones rank 102nd nationally against the run and gave up 239 yards and four touchdowns to Utah’s ground game during a 68-27 loss last week … Oklahoma 38, Iowa State 14. (7 p.m. ET, FSN Regional)

No. 3 Boise State at San Jose State: So you wanna be a college football coach do you? Take the plight of first-year San Jose State head coach Mike MacIntyre. His team has already faced Alabama, Wisconsin, Utah and Nevada, and lost to those ranked teams by a combined score of 166-33. Now the high-flying Broncos invade northern California looking to make a statement so they can stay in the forefront of the BCS national championship discussion. Pity MacIntyre and his Spartans, who have had trouble moving the ball this year no matter who the opponent has been … Boise State 52, San Jose State 3. (8 p.m. ET, WAC Sports Network)

Mississippi at No. 8 Alabama: It really doesn’t seem fair that nearly every Crimson Tide opponent this year plays Alabama after an off week. South Carolina used that formula – along with a withering run defense – to knock off the defending national champions last week. This week, Ole Miss gets its turn after taking last week off to prepare for its trip to Tuscaloosa. The extra week of preparation was probably a welcome one. The Rebels have lost six in a row in the overall series, nine in a row at Bryant-Denny Stadium and 23 of their last 24 in Tuscaloosa. First-year quarterback Jeremiah Masoli is getting more and more comfortable running the Rebels offense, and Ole Miss has won four of its last five against ranked opponents. But you have to believe the Tide players will be in foul mood after last week’s loss and looking for someone on which they can take out their frustration … Alabama 31, Mississippi 13. (9 p.m. ET, ESPN2)

No. 1 Ohio State at No. 18 Wisconsin: Ranked teams. Night game. Nationwide television audience. How much hype do you need as the Buckeyes try to stay atop the national rankings with a trip to rowdy and raucous Camp Randall Stadium? There are about a thousand storylines but really only one key – the Ohio State defense against the Wisconsin running game. Simply put, if the Buckeyes can stonewall the one-two punch of John Clay and James White ( a combined 1,177 yards and 17 TDs), the OSU offense that has been purring so well behind Terrelle Pryor has the ability to run away with the game. How practical is it to believe the Buckeyes can stop Clay and White? Michigan State drew up the blueprints when Sparty held the Badgers to a season-low 165 yards on the ground in a 34-24 win two weeks ago. When the UW run game sputters, quarterback Scott Tolzien struggles. That means turnovers and that means this one won’t be nearly as close as most people think … Ohio State 41, Wisconsin 17. (7 p.m. ET, ESPN)

Here are the spreads for the above games: Boston College(+22) at Florida State; Illinois at Michigan State (-7); Texas at Nebraska (-10); Iowa (-3) at Michigan; Utah (-20) at Wyoming; McNeese State at LSU (N/L); Iowa State at Oklahoma (-21½); Boise State (-40) at San Jose State; Mississippi (+20½) at Alabama; Ohio State (-4) at Wisconsin.

Enjoy the games and we’ll chat again next week.

Tressel Had It Right (Again) At Illinois

When Jim Tressel retreated into his ultraconservative shell in the second half of last weekend’s 24-13 victory at Illinois, old complaints that always seem just on the fringes of the Buckeye Nation began anew.

It’s pretty much a given that fans always want more offense. (In the spirit of full disclosure, most sportswriters do, too.) But exactly what did you expect from Tressel when his franchise quarterback went down in a heap early in the third quarter?

The gripe always seems to be that Tressel is way too conservative on offense, and compared to the go-for-the-jugular mentalities of most college coaches today, the OSU boss is too nice for his own good. It wasn’t very surprising, then, that the old grumblings about Tressel surfaced when Terrelle Pryor suffered what initially appeared to be a serious leg injury against Illinois.

Most critics figured it was the same old, close-to-the-sweater-vest Tressel using Pryor’s injury as an excuse to button up his offense in a tight game. Even when Pryor returned after only a handful of plays, the quarterback seemed to be OK despite a visible heavy wrap on his left thigh. Still, the coach wouldn’t let him do much of anything other than hand the ball to tailback Boom Herron.

My rebuttal? Tressel did exactly what he should have done in that situation. In fact, he turned in one of his better coaching jobs.

Anyone can look like a genius when his team is scoring 73 points and throttling weaker opponents without working up a sweat. Coaches earn their salaries – and I mean really earn them – by figuring ways to get their teams across the finish line in the toughest of situations.

Ohio State was on the road in its Big Ten opener playing against an Illinois team that had two weeks to prepare what looked like a pretty innovative game plan. Pryor, who had set up both of the Buckeyes’ first-half touchdowns with long runs and had already accounted for 150 of his team’s 167 yards of total offense, lay grimacing on the Memorial Stadium turf.

That’s when you expected Tressel to get fancy?

The OSU head coach did exactly what he should have done in that situation. He quickly scrapped the prepared game strategy for one that provided maximum protection for his team’s slight scoreboard advantage. Losing your Heisman Trophy candidate was like a bolt of lightning, so Tressel simply reverted to his worst-case-scenario philosophy – play ball-control on offense and rely on your defense to stop the opposition.

The bottom line for any head coach is winning, and any head coach will tell you they couldn’t care less how that winning is achieved as long as it is achieved. The Buckeyes were in a battle away from home, already without their starting tight end and now without their star player.

In that situation, you win the surest way by reducing your potential for making mistakes. You stay out of the air as much as you can – especially when the wind was howling like it always seems to do in Champaign – and you certainly don’t rely on untested players to handle the football.

You also err on the side of caution with your franchise quarterback no matter how close to 100 percent he tells you he feels.

Over the years, I have been as critical as anyone when it comes to Tressel and his conservative nature. All things being equal, I have often wondered why he sometimes likes to keep his fireworks wrapped in a plain brown wrapper.

But all things were not equal at Illinois. Not even close. In that situation, any coach worth his salt would do exactly what Tressel did – milk the clock as long as possible and then go play defense.

Throwing the football all over the lot and racking up style points certainly have their place, but winning trumps both every time. And no matter how they are achieved, no matter what else happens around the country, a win every Saturday remains the goal for every college football team.

Reach that goal at Ohio State and it doesn’t matter what happens with Boise State, Oregon, TCU, Oklahoma or Nebraska. You’re playing for the national championship.

OSU-INDIANA TIDBITS

** Ohio State and Indiana will be meeting for the 84th time on Saturday with the Buckeyes holding a lopsided 66-12-5 advantage in the series. That includes a 42-10-4 record in Ohio Stadium, including wins in each of the last eight games played in Columbus.

** The Buckeyes are currently enjoying a 15-game winning streak in the overall series. You have to go back to a 27-27 tie in 1990 to find the last time Ohio State failed to come away with a victory over Indiana. The Hoosiers’ most recent win in the series was a 41-7 decision in Bloomington in 1988.

** Since the Hoosiers took a 32-10 victory at Ohio Stadium in 1951, they have a 1-29-1 record in the Horseshoe. The lone victory was a 31-10 decision in 1987 and the tie was a 0-0 deadlock in 1959.

** Ohio State head coach Jim Tressel is a perfect 6-0 against the Hoosiers. The average margin of victory for the Buckeyes in those games has been 28.5 points.

** Indiana head coach Bill Lynch is in his fourth season with the Hoosiers and is playing the Buckeyes for the second time. He will be attempting to become only the second IU coach in the past 58 years to claim a victory over Ohio State. Bill Mallory, who coached the Hoosiers from 1984-96, claimed back-to-back wins over the Buckeyes in 1987 and ’88.

** Tressel has an 8-1 record in Big Ten home openers, including wins in each of the past five seasons. The only blemish on that mark is a 24-13 loss to Wisconsin in 2004.

** All-time, Ohio State is 68-23-4 in conference home openers. That includes a 14-1-1 mark against the Hoosiers.

** Tressel will be seeking his 100th career victory tomorrow at Ohio State. If he reaches that milestone, he do so in his 121st game with the Buckeyes. Only Michigan head coaches Fielding Yost and Bo Schembechler have reached 100 career wins quicker at a Big Ten school. Yost and Schembechler accomplished 100 wins in 119 games with the Wolverines.

** Tressel is making a rapid rise up the ladder in terms of all-time Big Ten victories. Last week’s win over Illinois was the coach’s 60th conference victory, making him only the 13th man in history with 60 or more Big Ten wins. Seven more league victories would move Tressel into the all-time top 10 and past George Perles of Michigan State (66, 1983-94), Murray Warmath of Minnesota (66, 1954-71) and Barry Alvarez of Wisconsin (65, 1990-2005). Legendary Ohio State head coach Woody Hayes (1951-78) is the career leader in conference victories with 152.

** Lynch is in his fourth season with the Hoosiers and his 18th year as a head coach. He has a 98-91-3 career record with stops at Butler (his alma mater), Ball State and DePauw as well as Indiana.

** Ohio State ranks first or second in the Big Ten in scoring offense, total offense, fourth-down conversions, total defense, rushing defense, scoring defense, pass efficiency defense, pass defense, turnover margin, PAT kicking and time of possession. Meanwhile, Indiana ranks first or second in the league in pass offense, kickoff returns, third-down conversions and PAT kicking.

** The Buckeyes have been remarkably consistent on offense this season regardless of the down. They are averaging 6.l yards on first down, 6.9 on second down and 6.8 on third down. OSU is averaging only 2.8 yards on fourth down, but the Buckeyes are a perfect 5 for 5 in fourth-down conversions.

** Indiana has 17 native Ohioans on its roster – three of which are projected to start against the Buckeyes – while Ohio State has only two players from Indiana. They are senior defensive tackle Dexter Larimore, who hails from Merrillville, and freshman tailback Rod Smith of Fort Wayne.

** IU quarterback Ben Chappell set single-game school records last week for completions (45), attempts (65) and yardage (480). Chappell is among the top six at Indiana all-time in completions, passing yardage, attempts, touchdown passes and total offense as well as being the most accurate passer in program history with a career completion percentage of 62.4. That is far ahead of second place occupied by Babe Laufenberg (1981-82) at 58.6.

** One Indiana passing record Chappell did not eclipse last week was the school’s longstanding mark for touchdown passes in a single game. Freshman quarterback Bob Hoernschemeyer threw six TDs during a 54-13 victory over Nebraska in 1943.

** While an Indiana upset of Ohio State would be surprising enough, the odds of the Hoosiers shutting out the Buckeyes would be astronomical. Indiana hasn’t pitched a shutout since a 10-0 win over Michigan State in October 1993 while Ohio State hasn’t been shut out since a 28-0 loss at Michigan in November 1993. The Buckeyes haven’t experienced a shutout loss at home since a 6-0 defeat to Wisconsin in October 1982.

** With 180 yards of total offense last week against Illinois, OSU quarterback Terrelle Pryor increased his career total to 6,203 and moved up two more notches into fifth place on the school’s career list in that category. He passed Greg Frey (6,098, 1987-90) and Joe Germaine (6,094, 1996-98). Next up is Steve Bellisari (6,496, 1998-2001).

** Pryor also now has 4,420 career passing yards and needs only 74 more to move past Craig Krenzel (4,493, 2000-03) into ninth place on the school’s all-time list.

** This week’s game will be telecast by ESPN with Dave Pasch handling the play by play, Bob Griese and Chris Spielman providing color analysis, and Quint Kessenich reporting from the sidelines. The game will also be telecast by ESPN3-D with Dave Lamont, Tim Brown and Ray Bentley on the call. Kickoff is set for shortly after 12 noon Eastern.

** The game will also be broadcast on Sirius satellite radio channels 90 and 127 as well as XM channels 102 and 197.

** Next week, Ohio State visits Camp Randall Stadium to play Wisconsin. Kickoff is set for 7 p.m. Eastern and the game will be televised by either ESPN or ESPN2.

THIS WEEK IN COLLEGE FOOTBALL HISTORY

** On Oct. 5, 1940, Michigan star Tom Harmon led his team to a 21-14 victory over Michigan State in Ann Arbor. The win was the Wolverines’ third in a row over the Spartans and was part of a streak that stretched to 10 games before the Spartans won in 1950.

** On Oct. 5, 1991, Fresno State kicker Derek Mahoney tied the NCAA record for most PATs in a game when he went 13 for 13 as the Bulldogs rolled to a 94-17 win over New Mexico.

** On Oct. 6, 1956, Penn snapped a 19-game home losing streak with a 14-7 win over Dartmouth. It was the Quakers’ first official Ivy League game, while Dartmouth’s lone touchdown came from quarterback Mike Brown, the same Mike Brown who is now owner of the Cincinnati Bengals.

** On Oct. 7, 1995, Texas Tech scored a 14-7 upset over eighth-ranked Texas A&M in Lubbock. The Aggies entered the contest with a 29-game Southwest Conference unbeaten streak, but Tech linebacker Zach Thomas returned an interception 23 yards for the game-winning touchdown.

** On Oct. 7, 1996, College Football Hall of Fame coach Wallace Wade died in Durham, N.C., at the age of 94. Wade was head coach at Alabama in 1925 when the Crimson Tide became the first Southern school invited to the Rose Bowl. A guard for Brown during his playing days, Wade became the first man ever to play and coach in a Rose Bowl. His Brown team lost to Washington State, 14-0, in the 1916 game, but his Alabama squad took a 20-19 thriller over Washington a decade later. Wade later coached at Duke – the football stadium there bears his name – and led the Blue Devils to their only Rose Bowl appearance, a 20-16 loss to Oregon State in the 1942 game.

** On Oct. 7, 2000, No. 7 Miami (Fla.) upset top-ranked Florida State, 27-24, when Seminoles kicker Matt Munyon’s last-second field goal attempt from 49 yards sailed wide right.

** On Oct. 8, 1966, Wyoming kicker Jerry DePoyster made NCAA history during his team’s 40-7 victory over Utah. DePoyster connected on field goals of 54, 54 and 52 yards and became the first kicker in NCAA history with three field goal of 50 yards or more in a single game. The Cowboys went on to a 10-1 season in ’66 that included a WAC championship and Sun Bowl victory over Florida State.

** On Oct. 8, 1977, seventh-ranked Alabama squeezed out a 21-20 victory over No. 1 USC when the Trojans scored a touchdown with 38 seconds remaining but their subsequent two-point conversion try failed.

** On Oct. 9, 1943, Indiana quarterback Bob Hoernschemeyer set an NCAA record for touchdown passes in a game by a freshman when he threw six as the Hoosiers took a 54-13 win over Nebraska in Bloomington.

** On Oct. 9, 1999, Michigan and Michigan State entered their instate rivalry with undefeated records for the first time in nearly 20 years and those in attendance at East Lansing got their money’s worth. The Spartans stormed out to an early lead before U-M head coach Lloyd Carr replaced starting quarterback Drew Henson with backup Tom Brady. Brady went on to complete 30 of 41 passes for 285 yards and two touchdowns, but his rally fell just short as the Spartans held on for a 34-31 victory.

** On Oct. 9, 2004, California QB Aaron Rodgers established a new NCAA record for consecutive completions. Rodgers completed his first three attempts against USC to run his streak to a record 26 completions in a row. Unfortunately, that was all Cal had to celebrate that day. The seventh-ranked Bears dropped a 23-17 decision to the No. 1 Trojans.

** On Oct. 10, 1936, trumpet player John Brungart became the first member of the Ohio State Marching Band to dot the “i” in Script Ohio.

** On Oct. 10, 1987, Oklahoma State took a 42-17 victory over Colorado to open its season with five straight wins for the first time since 1945. Leading the way for the Cowboys was a pair of fairly decent running backs – Thurman Thomas rushed for 110 yards and a touchdown while Barry Sanders added a score on a 73-yard punt return.

AROUND THE COUNTRY

** Seven more unbeaten teams have fallen by the wayside since last week’s blog, leaving 17 with perfect records at the Football Bowl Subdivision (Division I-A) level. Alphabetically, they are Alabama, Arizona, Auburn, Boise State, LSU, Michigan, Michigan State, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, Northwestern, Ohio State, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, Oregon, TCU and Utah.

** If you’re keeping score by conference as far as the undefeated teams are concerned, the Big 12 and Big Ten lead the way with four each. The SEC has three and the Pac-10, WAC and Mountain West each have two undefeated teams remaining.

** On the other side of the ledger, six Division I-A teams remain winless: Akron, Eastern Michigan, Florida International, New Mexico, New Mexico State and Western Kentucky. That list will be pared by at least two tomorrow when New Mexico and New Mexico State square off in Las Cruces while Western Kentucky travels to Florida International for a Sun Belt conference battle. Akron and Eastern Michigan are Mid-American Conference rivals but they do not meet this season.

** Alabama owns the longest current winning streak in I-A with 19 wins in a row. Western Kentucky has the longest current losing streak at 24.

** Michigan quarterback Denard Robinson has run (and thrown) himself into the Heisman Trophy race. When he ran for 217 yards and threw for a career-best 277 last Saturday against Indiana, Robinson became the first player in I-A history to pass and rush for 200 yards in a game twice during the regular season. Robinson leads the nation in rushing (905 yards, eight TDs), is fourth in pass efficiency (1,008 yards, seven TDs, one INT) and ranks No. 2 nationally in total offense with an average of 382.6 yards per game.

** Robinson’s 905 rushing yards is already the third-highest single-season total for a Big Ten quarterback. Antwaan Randle El of Indiana holds down both of the top spots with 1,270 yards in 2000 and 964 in 2001.

** Texas has the week off after last week’s 28-20 loss to Oklahoma. The Longhorns will head to seventh-ranked Nebraska on Oct. 16 trying to avoid their first three-game regular-season losing streak in the Mack Brown era. No Texas team has lost three games in a row during the regular season since 1997 when the Longhorns dropped four in a row under head coach John Mackovic and finished 4-7. Mackovic was let go after that season and Brown was hired away from North Carolina.

** Here’s a totally off-the-wall stat: Oklahoma and Alabama have each played two ranked opponents and have won both games. The 17 other schools that have played two ranked opponents so far this season are a combined 0-39.

** ESPN may be second-guessing its exclusive contract to telecast BYU games when the Cougars leave the Mountain West and go independent next season. The Cougars are now 1-4, their worst start to a season since 1973, and defensive coordinator Jaime Hill got pink-slipped after last Saturday’s 31-16 loss to Utah State. The Aggies had lost 10 in a row in the series with BYU, and beat the Cougars for the first time since a 58-56 thriller in 1993.

** Oklahoma running back DeMarco Murray is chasing a pair of longstanding school records. Murray has 55 career touchdowns and needs three more to pass the career mark held for more than 40 years by Steve Owens (1967-69). Murray is also bearing down on the school mark for all-purpose yards currently owned by Joe Washington (1972-75). Murray heads into this weekend with 5,478 all-purpose yards; Washington holds the OU career mark with 5,881.

** Congratulations to William & Mary, who ended defending Football Championship Subdivision national champion Villanova’s 12-game win streak against I-AA opponents last weekend. W&M scored a 31-24 victory that was especially sweet since the Tribe lost a 14-13 decision to Villanova in last year’s national semifinals.

** By the way, there are only four unbeaten teams left at the I-AA level. They are Appalachian State, Bethune-Cookman, Delaware and Jacksonville State, and one of the those teams already owns a victory over a Division I-A team this year. Jacksonville State defeated Mississippi, 49-48 in double overtime, earlier this season and Appalachian State gets its crack at the big boys Nov. 20 when the Mountaineers travel to No. 12 Florida.

FEARLESS FORECAST

The picks slipped ever so slightly last week, misfiring on Wisconsin-Michigan State as well as the Upset Special when Stanford couldn’t hold an early 21-3 lead over Oregon before getting blown out by a 52-31 score. Still, we were 9-2 straight up for the week and that makes us 48-5 for the season.

Against the spread, we suffered the first real hiccup of the season as a 4-7 week dropped the ATS mark to 30-20-3 for the season. We’re still well above water but need to do much better this week to stay that way.

Here are the lucky 13 games we’ll be watching this week.

TONIGHT’S GAME

No. 22 Oklahoma State at Louisiana-Lafayette: Among the four undefeated teams in the Big 12, no one seems to be talking about Oklahoma State. The Cowboys overcame a 21-7 halftime deficit last week to take a 38-35 thriller over Texas A&M, and now they hit the road for some primetime nonconference action. OSU features a potent passing attack with quarterback Brandon Weeden (1,259 yards, 13 TDs) and receiver Justin Blackmon (34 receptions, 558 yards, nine TDs) although the Cowboys are prone to mistakes. That shouldn’t really matter tonight although the Ragin’ Cajuns have won their last two against Big 12 opponents … Oklahoma State 45, Louisiana-Lafayette 14. (9 p.m. ET, ESPN2)

SATURDAY’S GAMES

Minnesota at No. 20 Wisconsin: How to beat the Badgers isn’t any big secret. Hold down their running game and they struggle. That’s exactly what happened last week when Michigan State held Wisconsin running back John Clay under 100 yards and out of the end zone during a 34-24 win for the Spartans. It’s difficult to see how the Gophers can duplicate that game plan, though. They enter tomorrow’s contest ranked 10th in the Big Ten and 96th nationally against the run. Look for Clay and the Badgers to bounce back and make Tim Brewster’s seat that much hotter in Minneapolis … Wisconsin 37, Minnesota 21. (12 noon ET, BTN)

Wyoming at No. 5 TCU: Wyoming athletic director Tom Burman did no favors for his football team when making out the 2010 schedule. The Cowboys have already absorbed a 51-6 whipping courtesy of Boise State and now they embark upon a two-week stretch that includes TCU and Utah. The Horned Frogs haven’t had any trouble racing out to a 5-0 start, outscoring their opposition by a 205-62 margin, and it could be more of the same against Wyoming. The Cowboys rank 119th out of 120 Division I-A schools in total offense and they’re 110th in total defense. Add to those ugly numbers the fact that Wyoming has lost 12 in a row to ranked teams and you get the recipe for a blowout … TCU 55, Wyoming 7. (3:30 p.m. ET, CBS College Sports)

No. 11 Arkansas vs. Texas A&M: The Razorbacks and Aggies renewed their rivalry last year when Arkansas rolled to a 47-19 victory in then-new Cowboys Stadium. That probably warmed the heart of former Razorbacks player Jerry Jones, and the Dallas Cowboys owner will be on hand again tomorrow afternoon when the teams return to his $1 billion playhouse. Not much has changed from last year other than the fact the Razorbacks are actually a little better than they were in ’09. They couldn’t quite hang on against Alabama a couple of weeks ago, partly because star quarterback Ryan Mallett pitched three interceptions. But since then Mallett has been on the money and he threw for 271 yards and four TDs last year against A&M. The Aggies can chuck the ball around pretty well, too, but not well enough … Arkansas 31, Texas A&M 24. (3:30 p.m. ET, ABC Regional)

No. 1 Alabama at No. 19 South Carolina: Can anyone derail the Tide’s march to another national championship game? The Gamecocks are next in line to try, coming off an open week following their 35-27 loss to Auburn on Sept. 25. You have to know that Steve Spurrier will have a few tricks up his sleeve and he’d better, especially on defense. SC gave up 334 yards to Auburn and that’s a big sign heading into a game that will feature Mark Ingram and Trent Richardson on the other side. The duo has already combined for 774 yards and 10 touchdowns not to mention a collective average of 7.6 yards per carry. That is potentially lethal against the Gamecocks, who make too many mistakes to entertain any thought of an upset … Alabama 34, South Carolina 14. (3:30 p.m. ET, CBS)

No. 17 Michigan State at No. 18 Michigan: The Spartans and Wolverines enter their rivalry match undefeated for the first time since 1999. MSU is also trying to extend its win streak in the series to three in a row, something that hasn’t happened since 1965-67. If Sparty wants that victory, he’s going to have to figure out some way to stop Michigan QB Denard Robinson. No one else has as the sophomore has dazzled his way into the Heisman race. Load up to stop Robinson from running like Indiana did last week and he’ll beat you through the air. Hang back and he’ll carve up your defense like a Thanksgiving turkey. Robinson’s critics claim he hasn’t faced a defense as strong as the one he’ll see tomorrow but from what little I’ve seen from the Spartans’ D, it’s a read-and-react unit and that plays right into Robinson’s strengths … Michigan 35, Michigan State 31. (3:30 p.m. ET, ABC/ESPN)

No. 3 Oregon at Washington State: Fireworks from the Quack Attack ought to continue this week with the high-flying Ducks visiting the Palouse. Oregon features the No. 1 offense in the nation (56.6 points, 569.2 yards per game) while the Cougars have one of the worst defensive units in college football. Among the 120 teams at the I-A level, Wazzu ranks 101st in pass defense, 109th in pass efficiency defense, 116th in scoring defense, 117th in rushing defense and 118th in total defense. As bad as defensive those numbers are, the Cougars aren’t very good on offense, either – they’re 109th in rushing and 92nd in scoring. It all adds up to a beatdown that will likely leave some nasty bruises … Oregon 63, Washington State 0. (5 p.m. ET, CSN)

Oregon State at No. 9 Arizona: Oregon is getting all the hype in the Pac-10 but the Wildcats are quietly putting together something special. While the Ducks dazzle with their offense, Arizona does it the old-fashioned way with defense and solid special teams. Mike Stoops’ team ranks second in the nation in total defense and third in scoring defense, and it’s ranked No. 1 in kickoff returns. The Wildcats come off an open week to entertain the Beavers, who cranked up some offense last week during a 31-28 win over Arizona State. But Oregon State still ranks 10th in the Pac-10 in total offense, and when you combine that with an eighth-place standing in total defense, you can see why Arizona is favored to break the Beavers’ current four-game win streak in Tucson … Arizona 20, Oregon State 10. (6 p.m. ET, Versus)

No. 10 Utah at Iowa State: Here are a few pertinent numbers. The Utes are coming off an open week and they are 5-0 coming off open weeks under head coach Kyle Whittingham. Utah has an 11-game win streak going against unranked opponents. Iowa State is 3-0 at home this season and 4-0 all-time against Utah. Of course, the Cyclones’ victories in the series came in 1970s when the Utes bore no resemblance to the team that has been one of the top offensive units for the better part of the last decade. This year, Utah not only scores points (44.3 per game), it also has a smothering defense that allows only 12.8 points per game. For an Iowa State team that has struggled at times on both sides of the ball, that is a scary proposition … Utah 43, Iowa State 14. (7 p.m. ET, Fox College)

Purdue at Northwestern: How much harder could the injury bug bite the Boilermakers? All-Big Ten receiver Keith Smith, running back Ralph Bolden and quarterback Robert Marve are all out with season-ending knee injuries leaving Purdue scrambling. Marve’s backup, Rob Henry, is raw – he just started playing the quarterback position four years ago. Meanwhile, the Wildcats will likely be without star tight end Drake Dunsmore but that shouldn’t make for much of a slowdown in the NU offense. QB Dan Persa has already accounted for more than 1,600 yards of total offense and ranks No. 1 in the Big Ten and No. 3 nationally in pass efficiency. The Wildcats needed a late field goal to beat Minnesota last week but shouldn’t need any comeback magic this week … Northwestern 27, Purdue 20. (7:30 p.m. ET, BTN)

No. 8 Auburn at Kentucky: If you haven’t been paying attention to the Tigers, perhaps it’s time you did. They have their own version of Denard Robinson in quarterback Cam Newton, a JUCO transfer who is second nationally in pass efficiency while averaging 94.8 yards rushing per game. As a result of Newton’s play, Auburn is looking to start 6-0 for the first time in six years. Standing in the way – as they usually do – are the Wildcats, who scored a 21-14 upset win at Auburn last year. Kentucky has a couple of electrifying players in its own right in running back Derrick Locke and receiver Randall Cobb, but the Wildcats are 11th in the SEC both in rushing defense and total defense. Watch them struggle trying to corral Newton … Auburn 31, Kentucky 17. (7:30 p.m. ET, ESPN2)

Toledo at No. 4 Boise State: By now you know the story. Despite a 59-0 win over New Mexico State, the Broncos got jumped in the polls by Oregon, a penalty Boise paid for its weak schedule. Things don’t figure to get much tougher this week when the Rockets invade the Smurf Turf, where the Broncos enjoy a 57-game winning streak. Boise State QB Kellen Moore is a legitimate Heisman candidate (1,069 yards, 11 TDs) and he ought to be able to pad those numbers and Toledo which ranks 11th in the 13-team MAC in pass defense. Even more to the point is the fact the Rockets are coming off a 20-15 loss to Wyoming, the same Wyoming team that two weeks earlier absorbed a 51-6 beating administered by the Broncos … Boise State 52, Toledo 3. (8 p.m. ET, WAC Network/Sports Time Ohio)

Indiana at No. 2 Ohio State: Brandon Saine, Boom Herron, Jordan Hall, Jaamal Berry and Carlos Hyde should be licking their chops this week as the Buckeyes take on an Indiana defense that ranks dead last in the Big Ten defending the run. To be blunt, if you can’t run on the Hoosiers you need to take a serious look at how your running game does business. That said, Indiana comes to Columbus loaded for bear on offense. IU quarterback Ben Chappell ranks fifth nationally in total offense and 12th in pass efficiency, and he has some big, physical receivers who could give fits to some of the smaller OSU defenders. Still, if the Buckeyes can control the tempo of the game by running the ball, and if Terrelle Pryor is anything close to 100 percent, Ohio State should be able to continue its mastery in this series. The Buckeyes are looking for their 16th consecutive win over the Hoosiers and their 42nd victory in the past 43 home games against unranked opponents … Ohio State 41, Indiana 24. (12 noon ET, ESPN)

Here are the spreads for the above games: Oklahoma State (-21) at Louisiana-Lafayette; Minnesota (+22) at Wisconsin; Wyoming at TCU (-34); Arkansas (-5) vs. Texas A&M; Alabama (-6½) at South Carolina; Michigan State (+4½) at Michigan; Oregon (-35½) at Washington State; Oregon State at Arizona (-7½); Utah (-6½) at Iowa State; Purdue (+9½) at Northwestern; Auburn (-6) at Kentucky; Toledo at Boise State (-38½); Indiana (+22½) at Ohio State.

Enjoy the games and we’ll see you next week.

Ohio State’s O-Line Play Up For Debate

There is a squabble currently raging within the Buckeye Nation, one that has been going on in one form or another for quite some time.

The debate involves the performance of the offensive line and battle lines seem to have been drawn between two distinct camps. One party believes the Buckeyes are the third-highest scoring attack in the nation because of the offensive line; the other thinks the team has achieved that lofty ranking despite some line play that can best be described as average.

I received more than my usual share of poison pen letters following last week’s blog in which I offered grades for each of the individual positions through the first quarter of the season. Most of the more pungent feedback I received took special exception to the C+ grade I gave the offensive line.

How could I downgrade the unit when the Buckeyes were purring along with three-game averages of 41.3 points and 460.7 yards? My reasoning for the middling grade was because I was expecting a little more out of a unit regarded by many as one of the finest offensive lines at Ohio State in several years.

I was looking for dominance, especially in games against such outmanned opposition as Marshall and Ohio. Perhaps I’m a little guilty of advancing age but I not only expect Ohio State to control the line of scrimmage against weaker opponents, I expect the Buckeyes to thoroughly dominate teams like the Thundering Herd and Bobcats.

As it turned out, I wasn’t alone in that evaluation. Former OSU All-American and three-time NFL All-Pro offensive lineman Jim Lachey agreed. So did College Football Hall of Fame linebacker Chris Spielman, who went so far as to continue his assessment following a 73-20 blowout of Eastern Michigan that included 645 yards of total offense for the Buckeyes.

Lachey, Spielman and I all agree that grading line play is a totally inexact exercise. Four members of the unit could execute textbook blocks on every play, but if the fifth man makes a mistake, the entire line looks bad.

Still, even those who cringe every time a criticism is leveled at the line play would have to acknowledge some breakdowns this year. No lineman can ever grade at 100-percent efficiency and there have been several times this season when running plays have gone nowhere.

Is that a product of running backs missing holes or no holes being created for them? Are the OSU ball carriers too tentative or are opposing linebackers and safeties taking advantage of a lack of backside protection to bring a running back down from behind?

Even against Eastern Michigan when the Buckeyes piled up a Jim Tressel era-high 342 yards and averaged 8.3 yards on 41 carries, the running game still seemed to sputter at times. Ten of those 41 carries – nearly 25 percent – netted 2 yards or less against a team that averaged 6-2 and 261.3 pounds along its defensive front four. Ohio State’s starting offensive line averages 6-5½ and 304.6 pounds per man.

Dominance very well could be in the eye of the beholder.

Yet even as I made my case and listened to others like Lachey and Spielman make theirs, I began to wonder if perhaps we’re looking approaching this argument from the wrong direction. We’re comparing the 2010 offensive line to road-grading units from the past that produced 1,000-yard rushers with regularity – and maybe that’s an unfair apples-to-oranges comparison.

Maybe Tressel has finally listened to those who have been screaming for him to open his offensive playbook and take full advantage of the weaponry at his disposal. Maybe, just maybe, Ohio State is no longer a tailback-oriented offense.

Looking at Terrelle Pryor’s output over the past couple of weeks is the main evidence in that argument. Tresselball is about the last way anyone would describe an offense that has gotten 598 yards of total offense and eight touchdowns from its quarterback over a two-game stretch – and that doesn’t even take into account a 20-yard touchdown reception.

Furthermore, take a look at Pryor’s passing performance in weeks three and four. They feature 42 completions in 55 attempts (that’s a gaudy 76.4-percent completion rate) for 459 yards and six touchdowns. The OSU attack has been precisely the kind usually employed by NFL teams to move the ball down the field. Don’t believe me? Watch Peyton Manning operate some Sunday afternoon and see if you don’t notice some similarities in his team’s offensive game plan to what the Buckeyes showed against Ohio and Eastern Michigan.

Add to that kind of lethal passing attack Pryor’s intrinsic ability to alter games with his mobility and suddenly the offensive line doesn’t have to blow opponents off the line of scrimmage.

No one should be confused that Pryor is the best running back on the team. He clearly isn’t and shows that every time Tressel calls for a quarterback draw. But there is no doubt Pryor is the best broken-field runner the Buckeyes have had in many, many years. Yes, he is going to take some sacks – sorry, offensive line – because he will always try to make something out of nothing. More often than not, however, he can make something out of nothing and it is usually something special.

Still, the debate over the pros and cons of Ohio State’s offensive line play will likely go on for quite some time – perhaps all the way to Jan. 10 when the argument can continue in the Arizona desert.

OSU-ILLINOIS TIDBITS

** Ohio State begins its 98th season of Big Ten play tomorrow. The Buckeyes are 457-190-24 (a .699 winning percentage) in conference play and their 34 Big Ten championships are second all-time only to Michigan, which has 42.

** Illinois embarks upon its 115th season as a Big Ten member. The Fighting Illini have an all-time conference record of 327-374-32 (.468), and they have won 15 league titles in their history.

** The Buckeyes have won at least of the Big Ten championship in each of the last five seasons. That is tied with Michigan (1988-92) for the second-longest run of league titles. Ohio State is chasing its own conference record of six championships in a row set from 1972-77.

** Ohio State has won three outright Big Ten championships in the last four years, the first time that has been accomplished since the Buckeyes did it between 1954 and 1957. Should OSU win another title by itself in 2010, it would become the first team to win four outright championships in a five-year span since Minnesota did it between 1937 and 1941.

** OSU and Illinois will meet for the 97th time since the series was inaugurated in 1902. The hold a 62-30-4 advantage in the overall series, including a 33-12 edge in Champaign.

** The series has been much closer in recent years. Since 1988, the Buckeyes are only 11-9 against the Illini.

** Between 1988 and 1992, the teams met five times and Illinois won them all. In the 16 games since, the Buckeyes are 13-3 with a perfect 7-0 record in Champaign. The Illini’s last win over Ohio State in Champaign was a 10-7 decision in 1991.

** The game will mark the Big Ten opener for both teams. Ohio State has a 70-23-4 record all-time in conference openers. Illinois is 46-61-7 all-time in league openers and has lost 15 of its last 16.

** Ohio State head coach Jim Tressel is 5-2 in his career against Illinois while Fighting Illini head coach Ron Zook is 1-4 vs. the Buckeyes.

** OSU begins its conference season on the road for the first time since 2004. The Buckeyes are 61-32-5 all-time in Big Ten road openers, including 6-3 under Tressel.

** Tressel is 8-1 overall in Big Ten openers with the only blemish a 33-27 overtime defeat at Northwestern in 2004. The Buckeyes’ average margin of victory in the other eight games has been 25.3 points.

** Zook is 1-4 in his previous conference openers. The lone victory came in 2007 when the Illini took a 27-14 win at Indiana.

** Tressel is 63-7 at Ohio State vs. unranked teams. Zook is 3-15 at Illinois against ranked teams but two of his victories have come against top-10 competition – a 31-26 win over No. 5 Wisconsin in 2007 and a 28-21 victory at top-ranked Ohio State in 2008.

** The Buckeyes have won 18 of their last 19 Big Ten road games with the only blemish a 26-18 loss at Purdue last season.

** Illinois is coming off an open week but a week off hasn’t ever been that much of an advantage for the Illini. They are 11-14 all-time after off weeks including a 4-3 record against Ohio State.

** Zook was defensive backs coach on John Cooper’s staff at Ohio State from 1988-90. The Buckeyes were 0-3 against the Illini during that stretch.

** Zook’s career mark as a head coach is only 46-54, including 25-41 at Illinois. But he can boast one accomplishment most of his Big Ten counterparts cannot. Zook has coached his team to victories at Ohio Stadium and Michigan Stadium, and Joe Paterno of Penn State is the only other Big Ten head coach who can claim that feat.

** Illinois running back Mikel Leshoure has rushed for 100 yards or more in four straight games dating back to last season, and he runs into an Ohio State defense that hasn’t allowed an opposing running back to top the 100-yard mark since USC tailback rushed for 105 during his team’s 35-3 win in 2008. No Big Ten running back has cracked the century mark against the Buckeyes since Daniel Dufrene of Illinois had 106 during the Illini’s 28-21 upset win in 2007. Since 2005, the Ohio State defense has allowed only seven 100-yard rushers and that is the best mark in Division I-A over that span.

** Another interesting matchup will take place if Ohio State decides to go for it on fourth down against Illinois. So far this season, the Buckeyes are a perfect 4 for 4 in fourth-down conversions while opponents are 0 for 2 in fourth-down tries against the Fighting Illini defense.

** On the flip side, it will be interesting to see what happens if Illinois reaches the red zone against the Buckeyes. The Illini are 9 for 9 inside the red zone so far this season (six TDs and three field goals) while OSU opponents have scored only four times (all TDs) in seven trips to the red zone.

** The Buckeyes and Illini square off for one of the most uncommon trophies in college football. Illibuck is a wooden turtle that goes to the winner of the game each year. The tradition began in 1925 with a live turtle being exchanged between the two schools. The turtle was selected because of its supposed long life expectancy, but the original Illibuck died only two years after the trophy game was inaugurated. Since 1927, nine wooden replica Illibucks have been carved, each with the scores from games on its back. The Illibuck is the second oldest trophy game in the Big Ten, surpassed only by the Little Brown Jug that Minnesota and Michigan have been playing for since 1903.

** With 328 yards of total offense in last week’s game, OSU quarterback Terrelle Pryor increased his career total to 6,023 and moved up another notch on the school’s career list in that category. He passed Mike Tomczak (6,015, 1981-84) to move into seventh place and needs only 76 more to vault into the top five. Greg Frey (6,098, 1987-90) currently ranks fifth and Joe Germaine (6,094, 1996-98) is sixth.

** Pryor now has 4,344 career passing yards and needs only 150 more to move past Craig Krenzel (4,493, 2000-03) into ninth place on the school’s all-time list.

** With four touchdown passes against the Eagles, Pryor increased his career total to 40. He is one of only five OSU quarterbacks with that many touchdown passes. The others are Bobby Hoying (57, 1992-95), Germaine (56), Troy Smith (54, 2003-06) and Art Schlichter (50, 1978-81).

** Pryor needs 321 yards to become only the sixth Big Ten quarterback with 2,000 or more career rushing yards. Antwaan Randle El of Indiana (3,895, 1998-2001) is the all-time leader followed by Juice Williams of Illinois (2,557, 2006-09), Rick Leach of Michigan (2,176, 1975-78), Rickey Foggie of Minnesota (2,150, 1984-87) and Cornelius Greene of Ohio State (2,080, 1972-75).

** Ohio State receivers Dane Sanzenbacher and DeVier Posey currently sit at Nos. 22 and 23 in career receiving yardage with 1,247 and 1,187, respectively. Both are poised to leap past several former Buckeyes soon – No. 18 Brian Stablein (1,289, 1989-92), No. 19 Anthony Gonzalez (1,286, 2004-06), No. 20 Buster Tillman (1,277, 1993-96) and No. 21 Reggie Germany (1,268, 1997-2000).

** OSU kicker Devin Barclay was a perfect 10 for 10 on PATs against Eastern Michigan, equaling the record for most conversion kicks in a single game set by Vic Janowicz during an 83-20 win over Iowa in 1950. Barclay has made all 24 of his PATs this season, which puts him more than halfway to the school’s single-season record of 44 in a row set by Vlade Janakievski in 1977.

** Barclay is currently a perfect 36 for 36 in PATs in his career. Tim Williams (1990-93) holds the OSU career mark for most consecutive PATs with 86.

** Last week’s 73-point outburst represented the most points scored by the Buckeyes since that 83-20 win over Iowa in 1950 and eclipsed the highest total for any Tressel-coached team. The high in Tressel’s previous 312 games as a head coach came during a 63-20 win over Alcorn State during Youngstown State’s march to the 1994 Division I-AA national championship.

** The 645 total yards against Eastern Michigan was also a new high for the Buckeyes in the Tressel era, eclipsing the 617 gained during the 2006 Fiesta Bowl win over Notre Dame.

** This week’s game will be telecast (again) by the Big Ten network with the announce team (again) of Eric Collins with the play by play, Chris Martin with color commentary and Charissa Thompson providing reports from the sidelines. Kickoff is set for shortly after 12 noon Eastern. (That’s 11 a.m. local time in Champaign-Urbana.)

** The game will also be broadcast on Sirius satellite radio channel 127 and XM channel 102. It will also be on the Westwood One radio network with Heisman Trophy winner Eddie George as part of the broadcast.

** Next week, Ohio State returns home to play Indiana. Kickoff is set for 12 noon Eastern and the game will be televised by either ESPN or ESPN2.

THIS WEEK IN COLLEGE FOOTBALL HISTORY

** On Sept. 29, 2001, New Mexico State posted a rare shutout, going on the road to tally a 31-0 victory over Louisiana-Monroe. How rare was the shutout? It was the first for the Aggies in 27 seasons, a span of 283 games which established an NCAA record for most consecutive games without a shutout.

** On Sept. 30, 1939, Fordham and Waynesburg College in Pennsylvania played in the first televised college football game, a contest seen by an estimated 500 viewers in the New York City area. Bill Stern called the play-by-play for W2XBS (now WNBC-TV) while a young Mel Allen did pregame interviews. Few television sets could receive the signal, so many of the viewers saw the telecast at the nearby New York World’s Fair.

** On Oct. 1, 1955, the sideline star power was plentiful as sixth-ranked Army rolled to a 35-6 win over No. 18 Penn State at West Point. The Black Knights were coached by Earl “Red” Blaik while the Nittany Lions were led by head coach Charles “Rip” Engle and assistant Joe Paterno. All three are in the College Football Hall of Fame, as is Army quarterback Don Holleder who led his team to the victory. Nearly 12 years to the day later, Holleder was an infantry major in the Army serving in Vietnam when he attempted to rescue a group of his fellow soldiers who had been ambushed. Holleder battled sniper fire to land his helicopter in a clearing, and while he was leading the evacuation he was struck by enemy fire and killed. He received the Combat Infantryman’s Badge posthumously and was later laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery.

** On Oct. 2, 1943, Purdue committed 11 turnovers in a game – and still won. Somehow, the Boilermakers lost nine fumbles and pitched two interception and still managed a 40-21 victory over Illinois. The performance set an NCAA record for most turnovers by a winning team.

** On Oct 2, 1993, Alabama matched its own school and Southeastern Conference records for consecutive victories when the Crimson Tide scored a 17-6 victory at South Carolina to mark their 28th win in a row. The mark tied the previous school and conference marks set between 1978 and 1980 when the legendary Paul “Bear” Bryant was patrolling the ’Bama sideline.

** On Oct. 3, 1992, third-ranked Florida State lost a 19-16 decision to No. 2 Miami (Fla.) when a last-minute field goal drifted wide right. Hurricanes QB Gino Torretta hit receiver Lamar Thomas to put Miami ahead, 17-16, with 6:50 to play. After a safety on special teams pushed it to a three-point game, the Seminoles drove deep into Miami territory before FSU kicker Dan Mowery pushed his 39-yard field goal attempt wide of the right upright on the final play.

** On Oct. 3, 1936, John Heisman, the legendary college coach and namesake of the Heisman Trophy, died at the age of 66. Born Oct. 23, 1869, in Cleveland, John William Heisman is credited with several innovations including invention of the center snap, dividing the game into quarters rather than halves, and leading the movement to legalize the forward pass. Heisman played at Brown (1887-89) and Penn (1890-91), and began his coaching career at Oberlin in 1892. He also coached at Akron, Auburn, Clemson, Georgia Tech, Penn, Washington & Jefferson and Rice, and compiled a career record of 185-70-17. Heisman was preparing to write a history of college football when he died in New York City. Three days later he was taken by train to his wife’s hometown of Rhinelander, Wis., where he was buried at the city-owned Forest Home Cemetery. Two months later, the Downtown Athletic Club in New York renamed its college football best player trophy in Heisman’s honor.

** On Oct. 4, 1969, Boston University scored a 13-10 upset at Harvard, ending the Crimson’s 10-game win streak and marking BU’s first-ever victory over Harvard since the matchup began in 1921.

** On Oct. 5, 1968, Arkansas running back Bill Burnett scored a touchdown to help the Razorbacks to a 17-7 win over TCU. It was the first of 23 consecutive games in which Burnett scored, an NCAA record that stood for 32 years.

AROUND THE COUNTRY

** After the first month of the 2010 season, only 24 unbeaten teams remain at the Football Bowl Subdivision (Division I-A) level. Alabama, Arizona, Auburn, Florida, Kansas, LSU, Michigan, Michigan State, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina State, Nevada, Northwestern, Ohio State, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, Oregon, Stanford, TCU, USC, Utah and Wisconsin are all 4-0 while Boise State and Indiana are 3-0.

** When Ohio State and Wisconsin each eclipsed the 70-point mark last weekend, they became the first Big Ten teams to score that many points 11 years. Penn State was the last conference team to top 70 when the Nittany Lions rolled to a 70-24 victory over Akron in 1999.

** Wisconsin set a new program record with its 70-3 win over Division I-AA Austin Peay. The Badgers’ previous high point total came in 1962 during a 69-13 win over New Mexico State.

** Speaking of offensive explosions, the Big Ten features four teams ranked among the nation’s top 15 in scoring offense and that is more than any other conference. Ohio State is No. 3, Indiana is No. 10, Michigan is No. 11 and Wisconsin is tied at No. 15.

** Ten teams remain perfect in red-zone offense this season but none have been as proficient as Stanford. The Cardinal are 26 for 26 inside the red zone, including 18 touchdowns and eight field goals. Next best is Nevada at 19 for 19 (14 TDs, five goals).

** It’s hard to believe anyone has had a better 13-second span on the football field than Stanford’s Owen Marecic did last week during his team’s 37-14 win over Notre Dame. Marecic ran for a 1-yard touchdown against the Fighting Irish with 7:58 remaining in the game, and then 13 seconds later returned an interception 20 yards for a touchdown. Marecic plays fullback and linebacker for the Cardinal and is the only Division I-A player starting on both offense and defense this season.

** The loss to Stanford was the 11th in a row by Notre Dame to teams ranked in the AP top 25. The Fighting Irish haven’t beaten a ranked opponent since a 41-17 win over No. 19 Penn State in 2006. Notre Dame’s last victory over a top-10 team? That would be a 17-10 win over third-ranked Michigan in 2005.

** How good has Florida freshman Trey Burton been so far in his rookie season? Burton has touched the ball only 20 times – 11 carries, eight receptions, one pass – and he’s tied for fifth in the nation in scoring with eight touchdowns.

** Better late than never. Minnesota will finally retire former All-America and College Football Hall of Fame defensive tackle Bobby Bell’s jersey No. 78 tomorrow during the Golden Gophers’ game against Northwestern. Bell, who was an all-state quarterback in high school, was a two-time All-American for the Gophers in 1961 and ’62 and won the 1962 Outland Trophy. He later enjoyed a 12-year NFL career with Kansas City Chiefs and earned induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1983. Bell will become the fifth former Minnesota player to have his jersey retired, joining Bronko Nagurski (72), Bruce Smith (54), Paul Giel (10) and Sandy Stephens (15). For a complete list of the Big Ten football players who have had their jersey numbers retired, you can check out my past blog entries here and here.

** With Florida’s win over Kentucky last weekend, Urban Meyer became the second-fastest head coach in college football’s modern era to reach 100 wins. Meyer accomplished the feat in the 119th game of his career. Only the legendary Bud Wilkinson of Oklahoma got to the century mark quicker, winning his 100th in career game No. 111.

** Discounting the so-called modern era, five coaches made it to 100 career victories faster than Meyer. Gil Dobie (108), George Woodruff (109), Wilkinson (111), Fielding Yost of Michigan (114) and Knute Rockne of Notre Dame (117). Dobie coached at North Dakota State (1906-07), Washington (1908-16), Navy (1917-19), Cornell (1920-35) and Boston College (1936-38) while Woodruff was head man at Penn (1892-1901), Illinois (1903) and Carlisle Indian Industrial School (1905).

** As the buzzards begin to circle over Tim Brewster’s head at Minnesota, an intriguing name has services should university officials decide to fire Brewster. That would be former Indianapolis Colts head coach Tony Dungy, who played his college football for the Golden Gophers. Dungy artfully dodged reporters’ questions when asked if he would be interested in returning to his alma mater should Minnesota dismiss Brewster, who heads into this weekend with a 17-33 record that includes an 8-24 showing in the Big Ten.

** Something has to give when Alabama hosts Florida tomorrow. The Tide has won 28 consecutive regular-season games while the Gators have won 24 regular-season contests in a row.

** How hot is the seat under Georgia head coach Mark Richt? The Bulldogs are 0-3 in the SEC, their worst conference start since going 0-4 to begin the 1993 league season. Making matters worse was last weekend’s 24-12 loss to Mississippi State, the first defeat for UGA in the series since 1974.

** College football is New Mexico is reaching new depths. The state’s two Division I-A schools – New Mexico and New Mexico State – are a combined 0-7 this season and have been outscored by a combined margin of 370-88. Something’s got to give, though. The Lobos and Aggies play one another Oct. 9 in Las Cruces.

** When George Blanda died Monday at the age of 83, most of the quarterback/kicker’s obituaries centered on his lengthy pro career. But before joining the NFL’s Chicago Bears in 1949, Blanda was a two-year starting quarterback for Bear Bryant at Kentucky. He threw for 1,451 yards and 12 touchdowns for the Wildcats in 1947 and ’48 and went on to become a 12th-round draft choice of the Bears. Blanda played 26 seasons in the NFL and AFL and is the only former Kentucky player to be enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

FEARLESS FORECAST

There are hot streaks and then there is the scorcher the Forecast has been enjoying so far this season. Last week, we posted the first perfect record in memory with an 11-0 finish with the straight-up picks. We are now a ridiculous 39-3 SU for the season, meaning the only one hotter than the Forecast in September was Colorado Rockies shortstop Troy Tulowitzki.

We weren’t nearly as prescient against the spread, but a 6-5 week is still a winner and puts us at 26-13-3 ATS for the season.

Here are the games we’ll be watching this week.

SATURDAY’S GAMES

Northwestern at Minnesota: It’s pretty much make-or-break time for the Golden Gophers. After struggling throughout the nonconference season, they get a shot at redemption with the dawn of the Big Ten season. It’s homecoming at TCF Bank Stadium, Minnesota enters this game with a 50-30-5 advantage in the series and the team scored a 35-24 victory over the Wildcats in Evanston last season. But Goldy has serious problems on defense, including a national ranking of 113th in pass efficiency defense. Meanwhile, NU quarterback Dan Persa is No. 3 in the country in pass efficiency. The Wildcats are looking for their second 5-0 start in the past three seasons and there is nothing to believe they won’t get it … Northwestern 30, Minnesota 20. (12 noon ET, ESPN)

No. 21 Texas vs. No. 8 Oklahoma: Because these two teams have been playing uninspired football so far this season, excitement for the 105th renewal of the Red River Shootout seems a little muted. The Longhorns got punked last week in Austin by UCLA in a 34-12 loss that was the worst home defeat of the Mack Brown era. Meanwhile, the Sooners are 4-0 but their last two wins were mistake-ridden affairs over Air Force and Cincinnati. Both teams have glaring weaknesses – Texas on offense, Oklahoma on defense – which may mean this one comes down to special teams. The Longhorns have won four of the last five in the series but that won’t mean much this year. It’s pretty much of a coin flip … Oklahoma 23, Texas 17. (3:30 p.m. ET, ABC Regional)

No. 20 Michigan at Indiana: The Wolverines have gotten most of the early season hype because of the performance of QB Denard Robinson but the Hoosiers shouldn’t be overlooked. Indiana quarterback Ben Chappell (890 yards, nine TDs) is sixth in the nation in pass efficiency and his team averages 41.33 points per game. That is just a whisker above the Wolverines, who average 41.25. If you like shootouts, this could be the game for you since U-M ranks 93rd nationally in total defense while IU is 92nd against the run – Robinson’s forte. The Michigan quarterback does have a banged-up knee, but you still shouldn’t overlook the fact that the Wolverines have won 31 of the last 32 in the series … Michigan 41, Indiana 38. (3:30 p.m. ET, ESPNU)

No. 11 Wisconsin at No. 24 Michigan State: The last time these two met at Spartan Stadium, the Badgers took an 11-point lead into the fourth quarter and wound up with a 25-24 loss. This time, they swear things will be different but you have to wonder. Wisconsin is considered to be a league championship contender every year but owns an extremely pedestrian 13-11 conference record over the past three years, a mark that includes a 4-8 road ledger. MSU head coach Mark Dantonio returns this week – albeit in the press box – after suffering a mild heart attack two weeks ago, and that should help to inspire his team. But the Spartans are trying to buck recent history. They haven’t started 5-0 since 1999 and have lost 14 of their last 15 against ranked opponents … Wisconsin 23, Michigan State 20. (3:30 p.m. ET, ABC Regional)

Tennessee at No. 12 LSU: The Tigers have a quarterback problem with starter Jordan Jefferson owning the worst efficiency rating in the SEC. Jefferson found himself on the bench briefly last week during his team’s 20-14 win over West Virginia, and Les Miles must certainly know no team is championship-caliber if it has a quarterback controversy. Still, LSU has been so good in the running game with Stevan Ridley (434 yards, three TDs) that the Tigers can get by with spotty play at the QB position. Ridley should add to his totals this week against the Volunteers, who can’t seem to stop much of anyone. Their defense ranks near the bottom of the conference in most categories. Add that to the fact Tennessee has lost nine of its last 10 to ranked opponents and you get the ingredients for a celebration on the bayou … LSU 34, Tennessee 17. (3:30 p.m. ET, CBS)

No. 22 Penn State at No. 17 Iowa: To be perfectly honest, Kirk Ferentz has Joe Paterno’s number. Ferentz has beaten the old master seven of the last eight times they have faced one another with the most recent two considered major upsets. There won’t be any upset this year since the Hawkeyes are favored – and they’re favored for good reason. They have a more veteran team, their QB Ricky Stanzi is savvier than Penn State freshman Robert Bolden, and Iowa’s defensive line will be able to take advantage of a hole created when the Nittany Lions lost right tackle Lou Eliades last week to a season-ending knee injury. Look for the Hawkeyes to pressure Bolden, which should lead to some turnovers that JoePa’s team cannot overcome … Iowa 27, Penn State 17. (8 p.m. ET, ESPN)

No. 7 Florida at No. 1 Alabama: Fresh off their come-from-behind victory last week at Arkansas, the Crimson Tide jump from the fire into the frying pan. The Gators are coming to Tuscaloosa looking for revenge after last year’s SEC championship game loss kept them from playing for a third national championship in four years. Some observers believe Alabama is primed for a letdown this week but we’re not buying it. The Tide has been rock-solid this season while Florida has made a boatload of mistakes, especially on offense. Points may be hard to come by since both teams rank among the top 15 nationally in scoring defense. We just think they’ll be harder to come by for the Gators … Alabama 20, Florida 13. (8 p.m. ET, CBS)

No. 3 Boise State at New Mexico State: Probably the less said about this one, the better. Let’s simply say the Broncos enter the soft part of their schedule with the winless Aggies. Boise State is working on a 17-game win streak while NMSU has lost 10 in a row. The Broncos average 40.3 points and 500 yards per game, and the Aggies give up an average of 41.7 and 520. And Boise is a perfect 10-0 in the series. About the only thing the Aggies have going for them is the fact that the game will be played in Las Cruces, so they can avoid a long trip home after getting their teeth kicked in … Boise State 52, New Mexico State 7. (8 p.m. ET, ESPN3)

No. 9 Stanford at No. 4 Oregon: With its Rose Bowl victory in January, Ohio State gave Jim Harbaugh the blueprint for how to beat the Quack Attack. Get physical with the Ducks and they don’t like it very much. The trick is corralling Oregon’s speedsters long enough to get physical with them. Harbaugh’s team can muscle up – just ask UCLA, Wake Forest and Notre Dame, who got outscored by a 140-38 margin by the Cardinal over the past three weeks. But does Stanford have what it takes to go to Autzen Stadium and end a four-game losing streak there? Last year’s game featured a knock-down, drag-out, last-man-standing 51-42 affair won by the Cardinal and they haven’t won two in a row from the Ducks since the mid-’90s. Buckle your seat belts for the Upset Special … Stanford 45, Oregon 42. (8 p.m. ET, ABC)

No. 25 Nevada at UNLV: The Wolf Pack are celebrating twice this week. They are 4-0 to start a season for the first time ever as a Division I-A school, and they’re in the national rankings for the first time in 60 years. Some are pooh-poohing the team’s ranking, suggesting the pollsters are perhaps trying to breathe a little life into Boise State’s otherwise weak strength of schedule. (The Wolf Pack host the Broncos on Nov. 26.) What those people don’t understand is that Nevada is a pretty good team. Don’t believe it? Just ask Cal or BYU, two teams that got streamrolled by the Pack the past two weeks. Nevada’s Colin Kaepernick (924 yards, seven TDs) is one of the best college quarterbacks you’ve never heard of, and he tends to go off when his team plays the Rebels. In two previous meetings, Kaepernick has a combined 797 yards and six touchdowns rushing and passing. Look for more of the same tomorrow night … Nevada 48, UNLV 13. (10 p.m. ET, The Mtn.)

No. 2 Ohio State at Illinois: There are some extremely intriguing matchups in this game. For example, OSU averages 49.3 points per game while the Illinois defense allows only 16.0. The Buckeyes are No. 5 nationally in run defense, allowing only 71.0 yards per game, and the Illini have the No. 18 rushing attack with a 229.0 average. Throw in the fact that Ohio State holds only a slight 11-9 advantage in the series since 1988 and you could come to the conclusion this game will be a tight affair. Look a little deeper, however, and you will find the Buckeyes have won 13 of the last 16 in the series including seven in a row in Champaign. Then there is the quarterback battle between Heisman Trophy candidate Terrelle Pryor of Ohio State and Illinois freshman Nathan Scheelhaase. Look for the OSU defense – embarrassed about last week’s performance against Eastern Michigan – to concentrate on stopping the Illinois run game and put a lot of pressure on a young QB who has already pitched three interceptions in only 57 attempts … Ohio State 44, Illinois 17. (12 noon ET, BTN)

Here are the spreads for the above games: Northwestern (-4) at Minnesota; Texas vs. Oklahoma (-3½); Michigan at Indiana (+10½); Wisconsin (-1½) at Michigan State; Tennessee at LSU (-16); Penn State at Iowa (-7); Florida (+8) at Alabama; Boise State (-41) at New Mexico State; Stanford (+7) at Oregon, Nevada (-20½) at UNLV; Ohio State (-17) at Illinois.

Enjoy the games and we’ll see you next week.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.